Morphological Changes in Synapses After Cerebral Ischemia and Environmental Stimulation

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161420
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Morphological Changes in Synapses After Cerebral Ischemia and Environmental Stimulation
Abstract:
Morphological Changes in Synapses After Cerebral Ischemia and Environmental Stimulation
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Briones, Tess
Contact Address:Medical-Surgical Nursing, 845 South Damen Avenue, Room 660, M/C 802, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Co-Authors:Lauren Jozsa
Recent reports have shown that complex environment (EC) housing after ischemic insult can enhance brain plasticity. Since synapses play a major role in regulating neuronal function we examined the effects of EC housing and exercise (EX) after transient global cerebral ischemia on alterations in synaptic contacts in the hippocampus, brain structure involved in learning and memory and area most vulnerable to ischemic damage. Fifty adult male Wistar rats were included in the study and randomly assigned to either the ischemic or sham group. Following ischemic or sham surgery, rats were further randomized to either EC, EX, or social condition (paired housing - control) group for 14 days and brains were then processed for electron microscopy. Analysis of synaptic alteration is ongoing and synapses are characterized by identifiable postsynaptic densities and the presence of three or more vesicles in the presynaptic element. Of primary interest are synapses formed by multiple synaptic boutons, major component of experience-related plasticity, and synapses with perforated postsynaptic densities (PSD) which are putatively associated with enhanced efficacy in neurotransmission. Multiple synaptic boutons are defined as synapses formed between an individual axonal bouton and more than one dendritic process (shafts or spines) while perforated synapses are identified by the presence of a completely partitioned and/or interrupted PSD. Furthermore, neuron and synapse density are being examined to determine the number of synaptic contacts per neuron. Findings from this study may be important to determine if environmental stimulation can enhance the adaptive neural plasticity in a compromised brain in a manner that may support functional recovery. AN: MN030226
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMorphological Changes in Synapses After Cerebral Ischemia and Environmental Stimulationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161420-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Morphological Changes in Synapses After Cerebral Ischemia and Environmental Stimulation</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Briones, Tess</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Medical-Surgical Nursing, 845 South Damen Avenue, Room 660, M/C 802, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Lauren Jozsa</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Recent reports have shown that complex environment (EC) housing after ischemic insult can enhance brain plasticity. Since synapses play a major role in regulating neuronal function we examined the effects of EC housing and exercise (EX) after transient global cerebral ischemia on alterations in synaptic contacts in the hippocampus, brain structure involved in learning and memory and area most vulnerable to ischemic damage. Fifty adult male Wistar rats were included in the study and randomly assigned to either the ischemic or sham group. Following ischemic or sham surgery, rats were further randomized to either EC, EX, or social condition (paired housing - control) group for 14 days and brains were then processed for electron microscopy. Analysis of synaptic alteration is ongoing and synapses are characterized by identifiable postsynaptic densities and the presence of three or more vesicles in the presynaptic element. Of primary interest are synapses formed by multiple synaptic boutons, major component of experience-related plasticity, and synapses with perforated postsynaptic densities (PSD) which are putatively associated with enhanced efficacy in neurotransmission. Multiple synaptic boutons are defined as synapses formed between an individual axonal bouton and more than one dendritic process (shafts or spines) while perforated synapses are identified by the presence of a completely partitioned and/or interrupted PSD. Furthermore, neuron and synapse density are being examined to determine the number of synaptic contacts per neuron. Findings from this study may be important to determine if environmental stimulation can enhance the adaptive neural plasticity in a compromised brain in a manner that may support functional recovery. AN: MN030226 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:21:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:21:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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