2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161421
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Entering Motherhood By Way of the Neonatal ICU
Abstract:
Entering Motherhood By Way of the Neonatal ICU
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Broeder, Jennifer
Contact Address:Nursing, 20 Edwin Avenue, St. Louis, MO, 63122, USA
This interpretive phenomenological study examined the process of becoming a mother of a preterm infant throughout infant hospitalization, after discharge, and within an employed mother’s daily life. The study revealed the mothers’ concerns, difficulties and joys by using an interpretive research approach. This framework supposed that mothers’ meanings of situations were embedded in skills, practices and language. A phenomenological view of stress and coping as delineated by Lazarus and Folkman (1984), and further extended by Benner and Wrubel (1989) was also central to this study. The convenience sample consisted of eight mothers recruited from three Midwestern hospitals with level III Neonatal ICUs (NICU). They were enrolled within two weeks of their preterm infants’ births. Mothers were married and Caucasian. Each mother held a minimum of a high school education and was employed while pregnant. For the mother to participate in the study, her preterm infant was 33 weeks gestational age at birth or less, a singleton birth, a first born, and without congenital anomalies. Interviews with the mothers occurred every two weeks while their infants were hospitalized and monthly after infant discharge for four months. Narratives of coping, caring practices, and getting to know the infant were obtained in repeated semi-structured interviews. Analysis included intensive reading of the interviews and searching for meaningful patterns, instances, or concerns in the narratives. This paper presents the emergence of mothering as a practice that was embedded in the mothers’ everyday actions of caring for and nurturing their preterm infants. Exemplars revealed how the mothers’ intuitive understanding of their infants, along with meaningful family traditions and practical reasoning guided their caregiving. The mothers’ practical learning included what they learned about themselves and their infants and the difficulties, possibilities, and challenges that helped or constrained them to become the mothers they wanted to be. AN: MN030153
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEntering Motherhood By Way of the Neonatal ICUen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161421-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Entering Motherhood By Way of the Neonatal ICU </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Broeder, Jennifer</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing, 20 Edwin Avenue, St. Louis, MO, 63122, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This interpretive phenomenological study examined the process of becoming a mother of a preterm infant throughout infant hospitalization, after discharge, and within an employed mother&rsquo;s daily life. The study revealed the mothers&rsquo; concerns, difficulties and joys by using an interpretive research approach. This framework supposed that mothers&rsquo; meanings of situations were embedded in skills, practices and language. A phenomenological view of stress and coping as delineated by Lazarus and Folkman (1984), and further extended by Benner and Wrubel (1989) was also central to this study. The convenience sample consisted of eight mothers recruited from three Midwestern hospitals with level III Neonatal ICUs (NICU). They were enrolled within two weeks of their preterm infants&rsquo; births. Mothers were married and Caucasian. Each mother held a minimum of a high school education and was employed while pregnant. For the mother to participate in the study, her preterm infant was 33 weeks gestational age at birth or less, a singleton birth, a first born, and without congenital anomalies. Interviews with the mothers occurred every two weeks while their infants were hospitalized and monthly after infant discharge for four months. Narratives of coping, caring practices, and getting to know the infant were obtained in repeated semi-structured interviews. Analysis included intensive reading of the interviews and searching for meaningful patterns, instances, or concerns in the narratives. This paper presents the emergence of mothering as a practice that was embedded in the mothers&rsquo; everyday actions of caring for and nurturing their preterm infants. Exemplars revealed how the mothers&rsquo; intuitive understanding of their infants, along with meaningful family traditions and practical reasoning guided their caregiving. The mothers&rsquo; practical learning included what they learned about themselves and their infants and the difficulties, possibilities, and challenges that helped or constrained them to become the mothers they wanted to be. AN: MN030153 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:21:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:21:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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