Racial Disparities in Physical Health Services, Mental Health Services and Cost among Severely Mentally Disabled Adults in Franklin County, Ohio

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161424
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Racial Disparities in Physical Health Services, Mental Health Services and Cost among Severely Mentally Disabled Adults in Franklin County, Ohio
Abstract:
Racial Disparities in Physical Health Services, Mental Health Services and Cost among Severely Mentally Disabled Adults in Franklin County, Ohio
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Chipps, Esther
Contact Address:4238 Conklin Court, New Albany, OH, 43054, USA
Co-Authors:Pamela Salsberry
Problem Statement: Equitable access to physical and mental health care services among those with a severe mental disability (SMD) is a significant public health concern. There are few studies documenting patterns of utilization. Understanding these patterns is necessary for develop interventions to target high risk groups. The research aims are: 1.To examine the impact of race, age and sex on psychiatric diagnoses, and Medicaid status among seriously mentally disabled adults. 2.To examine the impact of race, and psychiatric diagnoses on health services utilization, psychiatric treatment and health care costs in individuals with serious mental disabilities. Theoretical Framework: Aday and Andersen ?s Behavioral Model of Health Services served as the theoretical model guiding this research. Sample: Subjects were those receiving services from the local mental health board, were either African American or Caucasian, over the age of eighteen and living in the community (n=6550). For aim two, subjects were also continuously enrolled in Medicaid for three years (n=1592). Data: Data were administrative claims data from the Ohio Medicaid program or the Ohio Mental Health Department. Methods: This study involved a secondary analysis, employing a cross-sectional design for aim one, and a longitudinal design for aim two. Analysis was done using univariate and multivariate statistics. Results: Of the SMD study population, 69.5% were Caucasian. Fifty nine percent were females. Affective Psychoses (34%) and Schizophrenic Disorders (13%) comprised the largest diagnostic category. Utilization and cost data by diagnosis revealed differential patterns by major psychiatric diagnosis. Racial differences in diagnoses were found. Overall preventive care was minimal. Implications: This study supports the notion that SMD clients have differential and in some areas very poor access based upon psychiatric diagnoses. This study suggests provider and systems issues should be examined. AN: MN030038
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRacial Disparities in Physical Health Services, Mental Health Services and Cost among Severely Mentally Disabled Adults in Franklin County, Ohioen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161424-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Racial Disparities in Physical Health Services, Mental Health Services and Cost among Severely Mentally Disabled Adults in Franklin County, Ohio </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Chipps, Esther</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">4238 Conklin Court, New Albany, OH, 43054, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Pamela Salsberry</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem Statement: Equitable access to physical and mental health care services among those with a severe mental disability (SMD) is a significant public health concern. There are few studies documenting patterns of utilization. Understanding these patterns is necessary for develop interventions to target high risk groups. The research aims are: 1.To examine the impact of race, age and sex on psychiatric diagnoses, and Medicaid status among seriously mentally disabled adults. 2.To examine the impact of race, and psychiatric diagnoses on health services utilization, psychiatric treatment and health care costs in individuals with serious mental disabilities. Theoretical Framework: Aday and Andersen ?s Behavioral Model of Health Services served as the theoretical model guiding this research. Sample: Subjects were those receiving services from the local mental health board, were either African American or Caucasian, over the age of eighteen and living in the community (n=6550). For aim two, subjects were also continuously enrolled in Medicaid for three years (n=1592). Data: Data were administrative claims data from the Ohio Medicaid program or the Ohio Mental Health Department. Methods: This study involved a secondary analysis, employing a cross-sectional design for aim one, and a longitudinal design for aim two. Analysis was done using univariate and multivariate statistics. Results: Of the SMD study population, 69.5% were Caucasian. Fifty nine percent were females. Affective Psychoses (34%) and Schizophrenic Disorders (13%) comprised the largest diagnostic category. Utilization and cost data by diagnosis revealed differential patterns by major psychiatric diagnosis. Racial differences in diagnoses were found. Overall preventive care was minimal. Implications: This study supports the notion that SMD clients have differential and in some areas very poor access based upon psychiatric diagnoses. This study suggests provider and systems issues should be examined. AN: MN030038 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:21:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:21:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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