2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161425
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Does anxiety differ among patients by length of mechanical ventilatory support?
Abstract:
Does anxiety differ among patients by length of mechanical ventilatory support?
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Chlan, Linda
Contact Address:SON, 6-101 Weaver-Densford Hall, 308 Harvard St. SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA
Mechanical ventilation is commonly used in the ICU to treat respiratory failure. A majority of patients are usually weaned from mechanical ventilation within 5 days; a small, but increasing number require longer periods of ventilatory support. Theoretical Framework: Anxiety is a common response to the numerous stressors associated with mechanical ventilation. It is assumed that patients become more tolerant of mechanical ventilation over time resulting in decreased levels of anxiety. However, no objective data exist to validate this claim. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine if there are differences in anxiety level based on length of mechanical ventilatory support. Subjects: A convenience, purposive sample of 300 alert, adult patients receiving ventilatory support for a wide variety of medical indications were recruited from 9 ICUs in the urban Midwest. Method: Subjects rated their current level of anxiety on a 100mm visual analog scale (VAS-A) and via the 20-item Spielberger State Anxiety Inventory (SAI). Length of ventilatory support was categorized as < 5 days (n=117), 6-21 days (n=47), 22+ days (n=17), and chronic (n=19). Overall, subjects had been receiving ventilatory support for an average of 10.1 days (SD 23.6). Results: Mean anxiety levels by length of ventilatory support ranged from 40 (SD 31.8)-52 (SD 30.2) on the VAS-A, and 48.6 (SD 11.9)-54.2 (SD 11.9) on the SAI, indicating moderate anxiety. There were no significant differences in anxiety by length of ventilatory support on either measure [X2 (3)=2.3; p=.5; X2 (3)=5.6; p=.13 respectively]. Conclusions: The assumption that patients experience less anxiety the longer mechanically ventilated was not supported. These findings have significant care implications in that ventilated patients experience moderate levels of anxiety requiring on-going nursing management, regardless of how long they have received ventilatory support. AN: MN030134
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDoes anxiety differ among patients by length of mechanical ventilatory support?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161425-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Does anxiety differ among patients by length of mechanical ventilatory support? </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Chlan, Linda</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 6-101 Weaver-Densford Hall, 308 Harvard St. SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Mechanical ventilation is commonly used in the ICU to treat respiratory failure. A majority of patients are usually weaned from mechanical ventilation within 5 days; a small, but increasing number require longer periods of ventilatory support. Theoretical Framework: Anxiety is a common response to the numerous stressors associated with mechanical ventilation. It is assumed that patients become more tolerant of mechanical ventilation over time resulting in decreased levels of anxiety. However, no objective data exist to validate this claim. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine if there are differences in anxiety level based on length of mechanical ventilatory support. Subjects: A convenience, purposive sample of 300 alert, adult patients receiving ventilatory support for a wide variety of medical indications were recruited from 9 ICUs in the urban Midwest. Method: Subjects rated their current level of anxiety on a 100mm visual analog scale (VAS-A) and via the 20-item Spielberger State Anxiety Inventory (SAI). Length of ventilatory support was categorized as &lt; 5 days (n=117), 6-21 days (n=47), 22+ days (n=17), and chronic (n=19). Overall, subjects had been receiving ventilatory support for an average of 10.1 days (SD 23.6). Results: Mean anxiety levels by length of ventilatory support ranged from 40 (SD 31.8)-52 (SD 30.2) on the VAS-A, and 48.6 (SD 11.9)-54.2 (SD 11.9) on the SAI, indicating moderate anxiety. There were no significant differences in anxiety by length of ventilatory support on either measure [X2 (3)=2.3; p=.5; X2 (3)=5.6; p=.13 respectively]. Conclusions: The assumption that patients experience less anxiety the longer mechanically ventilated was not supported. These findings have significant care implications in that ventilated patients experience moderate levels of anxiety requiring on-going nursing management, regardless of how long they have received ventilatory support. AN: MN030134 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:21:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:21:08Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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