2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161427
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Obtaining Saliva Specimens After Major Surgery
Abstract:
Obtaining Saliva Specimens After Major Surgery
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Cong, Xiaomei
Contact Address:Frances Payne Bolton SON, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA
Co-Authors:Marion Good; Stephen Wotman; Sukhee Ahn; Gene C. Anderson
The purpose is to report the amount and flow rate of saliva collected from patients after abdominal surgery. It is useful for researchers who wish to measure stress and immune factors. Theoretically saliva is an easily obtained measure of biological markers of stress and immune function. To test this, sixty-eight men and women, 47±10 years, scheduled for major abdominal surgery and expected to use patient controlled analgesia were included. Excluded were small surgeries and epidural analgesia. Data is a preliminary analysis of a larger randomized study of relaxation and music, patient teaching, and combination on pain, cortisol, SIgA. Parotid saliva from both glands was collected before and after the interventions were used for 20 minutes in the morning and afternoon on postoperative day 2. A stopwatch was used to measure minutes and seconds. With a pipette, saliva was put into a graduated collection tube and measured in milliliters. The flow rate was the milliliters divided by the minutes of collection time (ml per min). There were missed saliva tests (18% to 40%) due to nausea, sleeping, etc. The success of obtaining saliva, when attempted, ranged from 74% to 78%. Means ranged from .90±.87 ml to 1.10±.85 ml. The flow rate ranged from .23±.23 ml/min to .33±.26 ml/min, but was significantly less for those on antihypertensive medication on two tests. The amount and flow rate of persons after major abdominal surgery is low compared to parotid saliva from healthy subjects in the literature. Amounts of > .1 to .3 ml were the minimum for analysis of cortisol and/or sIgA. Researchers can expect missing data and low saliva flow rates in postoperative abdominal surgical patients, even with control for antihypertensive medication. AN: MN030242
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleObtaining Saliva Specimens After Major Surgeryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161427-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Obtaining Saliva Specimens After Major Surgery</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cong, Xiaomei</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Frances Payne Bolton SON, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Marion Good; Stephen Wotman; Sukhee Ahn; Gene C. Anderson</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose is to report the amount and flow rate of saliva collected from patients after abdominal surgery. It is useful for researchers who wish to measure stress and immune factors. Theoretically saliva is an easily obtained measure of biological markers of stress and immune function. To test this, sixty-eight men and women, 47&plusmn;10 years, scheduled for major abdominal surgery and expected to use patient controlled analgesia were included. Excluded were small surgeries and epidural analgesia. Data is a preliminary analysis of a larger randomized study of relaxation and music, patient teaching, and combination on pain, cortisol, SIgA. Parotid saliva from both glands was collected before and after the interventions were used for 20 minutes in the morning and afternoon on postoperative day 2. A stopwatch was used to measure minutes and seconds. With a pipette, saliva was put into a graduated collection tube and measured in milliliters. The flow rate was the milliliters divided by the minutes of collection time (ml per min). There were missed saliva tests (18% to 40%) due to nausea, sleeping, etc. The success of obtaining saliva, when attempted, ranged from 74% to 78%. Means ranged from .90&plusmn;.87 ml to 1.10&plusmn;.85 ml. The flow rate ranged from .23&plusmn;.23 ml/min to .33&plusmn;.26 ml/min, but was significantly less for those on antihypertensive medication on two tests. The amount and flow rate of persons after major abdominal surgery is low compared to parotid saliva from healthy subjects in the literature. Amounts of &gt; .1 to .3 ml were the minimum for analysis of cortisol and/or sIgA. Researchers can expect missing data and low saliva flow rates in postoperative abdominal surgical patients, even with control for antihypertensive medication. AN: MN030242 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:21:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:21:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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