2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161429
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hopelessness and Depression in Myocardial Infarction
Abstract:
Hopelessness and Depression in Myocardial Infarction
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Dunn, Susan
Contact Address:CON, 4545 Loggers Run NE, Grand Rapids, MI, 49525, USA
Co-Authors:William Corser; Margaret Holmes-Rovner
Coronary heart disease and depression are highly prevalent and comorbid public health problems resulting in substantial excess morbidity and mortality. Hopelessness has been strongly associated with the presence of depression in individuals with physical illness and has been identified as an important predictor of increased morbidity and mortality in a number of illnesses. However, little research has been done to describe the prevalence and severity of hopelessness symptoms among people in the post-myocardial infarction (MI) recovery period. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to describe the prevalence and severity of hopelessness and depression symptoms among subjects at 5-7 days post-MI. Theoretical Framework: Abramson's Theory of Hopelessness Depression provides the framework for this study. According to this theory, hopelessness can be prompted by a negative life event and can cause a sub-type of depression or be independent of depression. Methodology: An anticipated sample size of 340 subjects will come from the AHRQ-funded project titled "Patient Decision Support and Coaching Project: Heart After Hospital Recovery Planner" (HARP). Subjects will complete the Center for Epidemiologic Studies- Depression Scale and the five-item cognitive expectations factor from the Beck Hopelessness Scale. The proportion of subjects who express at least one symptom of hopelessness or depression will be evaluated. For those reporting at least one symptom, the mean and standard deviation of the numbers of symptoms of hopelessness and depression will be estimated. The frequency distribution of hopelessness and depression and specificity of symptom experience will also be examined. Implications: This initial research will be the foundation for further analyses describing the relationships between hopelessness and depression symptoms and hopelessness symptoms, cardiac rehabilitation exercise adherence, and physical functioning at 5-7 days (baseline) and 3 months post-MI. This information will be foundational for developing a program of nursing intervention research post-doctorally. AN: MN030024
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHopelessness and Depression in Myocardial Infarctionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161429-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Hopelessness and Depression in Myocardial Infarction</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Dunn, Susan</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 4545 Loggers Run NE, Grand Rapids, MI, 49525, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">William Corser; Margaret Holmes-Rovner</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Coronary heart disease and depression are highly prevalent and comorbid public health problems resulting in substantial excess morbidity and mortality. Hopelessness has been strongly associated with the presence of depression in individuals with physical illness and has been identified as an important predictor of increased morbidity and mortality in a number of illnesses. However, little research has been done to describe the prevalence and severity of hopelessness symptoms among people in the post-myocardial infarction (MI) recovery period. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to describe the prevalence and severity of hopelessness and depression symptoms among subjects at 5-7 days post-MI. Theoretical Framework: Abramson's Theory of Hopelessness Depression provides the framework for this study. According to this theory, hopelessness can be prompted by a negative life event and can cause a sub-type of depression or be independent of depression. Methodology: An anticipated sample size of 340 subjects will come from the AHRQ-funded project titled &quot;Patient Decision Support and Coaching Project: Heart After Hospital Recovery Planner&quot; (HARP). Subjects will complete the Center for Epidemiologic Studies- Depression Scale and the five-item cognitive expectations factor from the Beck Hopelessness Scale. The proportion of subjects who express at least one symptom of hopelessness or depression will be evaluated. For those reporting at least one symptom, the mean and standard deviation of the numbers of symptoms of hopelessness and depression will be estimated. The frequency distribution of hopelessness and depression and specificity of symptom experience will also be examined. Implications: This initial research will be the foundation for further analyses describing the relationships between hopelessness and depression symptoms and hopelessness symptoms, cardiac rehabilitation exercise adherence, and physical functioning at 5-7 days (baseline) and 3 months post-MI. This information will be foundational for developing a program of nursing intervention research post-doctorally. AN: MN030024 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:21:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:21:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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