2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161430
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Decision to Complete Advance Directives
Abstract:
Decision to Complete Advance Directives
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Durbin, Christine
Contact Address:SON, Suite 4456, 411 East Broadway, East St. Louis, IL, 62201, USA
Co-Authors:Anne Fish
Advance directives for health care treatment decisions are advocated by several states and a federal mandate through the 1991 Patient Self-Determination Act. The goal of advance directives is to ensure that a patient's end-of-life treatment decisions are known when that patient is no longer able to communicate. Despite efforts by providers, facilities, and agencies, advance directive completion rates average less than 20%. Several studies have examined specific education strategies to improve completion rates with some success; however reasons cited for non-completion are unclear, although the populations studied agreed that an advance directive is useful and should be completed. Most studies of advance directive completion have been conducted on inpatients making simultaneous stressful health care decisions. Problems in these studies included instability of patient preferences, questionable patient cognitive capacity and inconsistent surrogate knowledge of patient preferences. Using Janis and Mann's conflict model of patient decision-making behavior, this study examines a part of the patient decision-making process related to completing an advance directive. Using a repeated measures design, community-living adults will be randomly assigned to one of two comparison groups. One group will view a videotape and one group will receive written information on advance directives. At baseline, each group will complete the advance directive attitude scale, the decision-control preference scale, the mini-mental status exam, and the SF-36. One month later, each group will complete the same tests and will be measured for advance directive completion. The sample will be drawn from city and county area parish nurse groups. An 80% power with a large effect size and an alpha of .05 will be achieved if 30 subjects can be retained in each group. Two-way ANOVA and a post-hoc Scheffe's test will be used for data analysis. AN: MN030120
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDecision to Complete Advance Directivesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161430-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Decision to Complete Advance Directives</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Durbin, Christine</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, Suite 4456, 411 East Broadway, East St. Louis, IL, 62201, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Anne Fish</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Advance directives for health care treatment decisions are advocated by several states and a federal mandate through the 1991 Patient Self-Determination Act. The goal of advance directives is to ensure that a patient's end-of-life treatment decisions are known when that patient is no longer able to communicate. Despite efforts by providers, facilities, and agencies, advance directive completion rates average less than 20%. Several studies have examined specific education strategies to improve completion rates with some success; however reasons cited for non-completion are unclear, although the populations studied agreed that an advance directive is useful and should be completed. Most studies of advance directive completion have been conducted on inpatients making simultaneous stressful health care decisions. Problems in these studies included instability of patient preferences, questionable patient cognitive capacity and inconsistent surrogate knowledge of patient preferences. Using Janis and Mann's conflict model of patient decision-making behavior, this study examines a part of the patient decision-making process related to completing an advance directive. Using a repeated measures design, community-living adults will be randomly assigned to one of two comparison groups. One group will view a videotape and one group will receive written information on advance directives. At baseline, each group will complete the advance directive attitude scale, the decision-control preference scale, the mini-mental status exam, and the SF-36. One month later, each group will complete the same tests and will be measured for advance directive completion. The sample will be drawn from city and county area parish nurse groups. An 80% power with a large effect size and an alpha of .05 will be achieved if 30 subjects can be retained in each group. Two-way ANOVA and a post-hoc Scheffe's test will be used for data analysis. AN: MN030120 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:21:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:21:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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