2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161435
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Claiming Health: Mammography Screening Decision-Making
Abstract:
Claiming Health: Mammography Screening Decision-Making
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Fowler, Barbara
Contact Address:CON, 3640 Colonel Glenn Highway, Dayton, OH, 45435-0001, USA
Grounded Theory (GT) research methods were used to: (1) develop, expand, and verify the basic social psychological process (BSP) and interrelated concepts emerging from the data; (2) examine in greater detail the social contexts and processes of mammography-screening decision-making in older, urban African-American (AA) women; and (3) understand the potential influences (e.g., beliefs in God or a higher Supreme Being, role expectations of significant others, past and present experiences with healthcare professionals and systems, and the nature of the client/physician relationship) on mammography-screening decision-making. Thirty AA women aged 52 to 72 of lower-and-middle-income socioeconomic status (SES) participated in two separate individual or dyad interviews in the privacy of their home, place of employment or church rectory. The findings generated from rigorous data analyses using constant comparison methods revealed a substantive GT of "Claiming Health" that was associated with seven traditional and non-traditional strategies of health decision-making. The strategies were: (1) believing in God or a higher Supreme Being; (2) recognizing personal or familial risk factors of breast cancer; (3) accepting diverse caregiving roles; (4) valuing the opinions of significant others; (5) relying on familiar self-care practices or lay home remedies for health maintenance; (6) acknowledging prior experiences with healthcare professionals and systems; and (7) conjuring or appealing to fears and fatalistic beliefs of breast cancer and related treatment. Each of these strategies provided the basis for a range of three different decision-making styles: (1) "taking charge", "enduring", and "protesting" situations regarding mammography screening. The results of this substantive GT study lend credence to the need for changes in healthcare delivery, health education, further research, and health policy decision-making of older, urban AA women of diverse SES and significant others. AN: MN030104
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleClaiming Health: Mammography Screening Decision-Makingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161435-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Claiming Health: Mammography Screening Decision-Making</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Fowler, Barbara</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 3640 Colonel Glenn Highway, Dayton, OH, 45435-0001, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Grounded Theory (GT) research methods were used to: (1) develop, expand, and verify the basic social psychological process (BSP) and interrelated concepts emerging from the data; (2) examine in greater detail the social contexts and processes of mammography-screening decision-making in older, urban African-American (AA) women; and (3) understand the potential influences (e.g., beliefs in God or a higher Supreme Being, role expectations of significant others, past and present experiences with healthcare professionals and systems, and the nature of the client/physician relationship) on mammography-screening decision-making. Thirty AA women aged 52 to 72 of lower-and-middle-income socioeconomic status (SES) participated in two separate individual or dyad interviews in the privacy of their home, place of employment or church rectory. The findings generated from rigorous data analyses using constant comparison methods revealed a substantive GT of &quot;Claiming Health&quot; that was associated with seven traditional and non-traditional strategies of health decision-making. The strategies were: (1) believing in God or a higher Supreme Being; (2) recognizing personal or familial risk factors of breast cancer; (3) accepting diverse caregiving roles; (4) valuing the opinions of significant others; (5) relying on familiar self-care practices or lay home remedies for health maintenance; (6) acknowledging prior experiences with healthcare professionals and systems; and (7) conjuring or appealing to fears and fatalistic beliefs of breast cancer and related treatment. Each of these strategies provided the basis for a range of three different decision-making styles: (1) &quot;taking charge&quot;, &quot;enduring&quot;, and &quot;protesting&quot; situations regarding mammography screening. The results of this substantive GT study lend credence to the need for changes in healthcare delivery, health education, further research, and health policy decision-making of older, urban AA women of diverse SES and significant others. AN: MN030104 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:21:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:21:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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