2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161436
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Use of Complementary Therapies by Nurse Assistants in Long-Term Care
Abstract:
Use of Complementary Therapies by Nurse Assistants in Long-Term Care
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Fox, Sister Sharon
Contact Address:9601 Union Road, Donaldson, IN, 46513, USA
The high turnover rate of nurse assistants in long-term care is a growing and costly problem that places both residents and caregivers at risk. Using Watson's (1985) carative factor "gratification of human needs" as a framework, this study examined whether learning and use of complementary therapies by nurse assistants in long-term care would increase job satisfaction through growth in achievement, affiliation, and self-actualization. Ten certified nurse assistants at a privately owned licensed retirement/nursing home volunteered to attend an inservice to learn the use of touch, music, and aromatherapy in caring for residents. Using a pre-experimental design, a pretest-posttest analysis found a significant difference, suggesting learning following instruction (t=-4.16, p=0.002). Nonsignificant differences with retesting after the study suggested retention of learning (t=-0.67, p=0.520). Beliefs about the therapies before and after the experience with the therapies found a significant change in acceptance of aromatherapy (t=3.28, p=0.010); music and touch showed a positive though nonsignificant change (0.399 and p=0.087). All participants indicated increased job satisfaction (scale 1-5, M=4.3, SD=0.823). Comments reflected a positive experience for both residents and nurse assistants. The findings suggest that use of complementary therapies by nurse assistants is a potential means of improving job satisfaction for nurse assistants in long-term care. AN: MN030050
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUse of Complementary Therapies by Nurse Assistants in Long-Term Careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161436-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Use of Complementary Therapies by Nurse Assistants in Long-Term Care </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Fox, Sister Sharon</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">9601 Union Road, Donaldson, IN, 46513, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The high turnover rate of nurse assistants in long-term care is a growing and costly problem that places both residents and caregivers at risk. Using Watson's (1985) carative factor &quot;gratification of human needs&quot; as a framework, this study examined whether learning and use of complementary therapies by nurse assistants in long-term care would increase job satisfaction through growth in achievement, affiliation, and self-actualization. Ten certified nurse assistants at a privately owned licensed retirement/nursing home volunteered to attend an inservice to learn the use of touch, music, and aromatherapy in caring for residents. Using a pre-experimental design, a pretest-posttest analysis found a significant difference, suggesting learning following instruction (t=-4.16, p=0.002). Nonsignificant differences with retesting after the study suggested retention of learning (t=-0.67, p=0.520). Beliefs about the therapies before and after the experience with the therapies found a significant change in acceptance of aromatherapy (t=3.28, p=0.010); music and touch showed a positive though nonsignificant change (0.399 and p=0.087). All participants indicated increased job satisfaction (scale 1-5, M=4.3, SD=0.823). Comments reflected a positive experience for both residents and nurse assistants. The findings suggest that use of complementary therapies by nurse assistants is a potential means of improving job satisfaction for nurse assistants in long-term care. AN: MN030050 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:21:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:21:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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