End of Life Care Preferences in African Americans: a Descriptive Foundation for Knowledge-Building

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161437
Type:
Presentation
Title:
End of Life Care Preferences in African Americans: a Descriptive Foundation for Knowledge-Building
Abstract:
End of Life Care Preferences in African Americans: a Descriptive Foundation for Knowledge-Building
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Franklin, Wanda
Contact Address:CON, 225 South Main Street, 520 Polsky Bldg, Akron, OH, 44325, USA
Co-Authors:Margaret Wineman; Victoria Schirm
African Americans are reported to be less knowledgeable about end of life care planning when compared to white Americans. Specifically, African Americans are less likely to have written living wills or advance directives. Research is needed to find mechanisms for increasing knowledge about and participation in end of life care planning by African Americans. Theoretical/Conceptual Framework: The Kolcaba Theory of Comfort provides a framework for investigation of holistic nursing care in older adults at the end of life. The spiritual aspects of comfort, in particular, will serve to organize the knowledge gleaned through this study. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to describe end of life care preferences in African American community residents. This information will help to expand knowledge and provide culturally competent assistance in the development, implementation, and evaluation of end of life care planning for older minority adults. Sample: A purposive sample of 30 African American subjects, aged 55 years and older, will be recruited through local church communities. Methods: Data will be collected using a qualitative approach. Narrative interviews from focus group and individual subjects will be transcribed and subjected to a categorical-content analysis. In addition, individual subjects will complete the Preferences for Care Near the End of Life (PCEOL) questionnaire. This instrument allows subjects to answer questions related to end of life preferences in five dimensions: decision-making, location of care, symptom management, relationships, and continuity of care. Implications: Data gathered from this study will be used as a beginning foundation for building knowledge about older African Americans' preferences for end of life care, living wills, and advance directives. Future descriptive research with larger samples will continue to build the knowledge base and interventions can then be designed to help elderly African Americans participate in decision-making about personal end of life issues. AN: MN030017
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEnd of Life Care Preferences in African Americans: a Descriptive Foundation for Knowledge-Buildingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161437-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">End of Life Care Preferences in African Americans: a Descriptive Foundation for Knowledge-Building </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Franklin, Wanda</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 225 South Main Street, 520 Polsky Bldg, Akron, OH, 44325, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Margaret Wineman; Victoria Schirm</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">African Americans are reported to be less knowledgeable about end of life care planning when compared to white Americans. Specifically, African Americans are less likely to have written living wills or advance directives. Research is needed to find mechanisms for increasing knowledge about and participation in end of life care planning by African Americans. Theoretical/Conceptual Framework: The Kolcaba Theory of Comfort provides a framework for investigation of holistic nursing care in older adults at the end of life. The spiritual aspects of comfort, in particular, will serve to organize the knowledge gleaned through this study. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to describe end of life care preferences in African American community residents. This information will help to expand knowledge and provide culturally competent assistance in the development, implementation, and evaluation of end of life care planning for older minority adults. Sample: A purposive sample of 30 African American subjects, aged 55 years and older, will be recruited through local church communities. Methods: Data will be collected using a qualitative approach. Narrative interviews from focus group and individual subjects will be transcribed and subjected to a categorical-content analysis. In addition, individual subjects will complete the Preferences for Care Near the End of Life (PCEOL) questionnaire. This instrument allows subjects to answer questions related to end of life preferences in five dimensions: decision-making, location of care, symptom management, relationships, and continuity of care. Implications: Data gathered from this study will be used as a beginning foundation for building knowledge about older African Americans' preferences for end of life care, living wills, and advance directives. Future descriptive research with larger samples will continue to build the knowledge base and interventions can then be designed to help elderly African Americans participate in decision-making about personal end of life issues. AN: MN030017</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:21:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:21:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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