2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161440
Type:
Presentation
Title:
General Public Responses to Terrorist Attack and Aftermath
Abstract:
General Public Responses to Terrorist Attack and Aftermath
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Hall, Joanne
Contact Address:4309 Valdena Drive, Knoxville, TN, 37914, USA
Following the September 11 attacks there was the onset of war and bioterrorism. These three events affected not only those immediately involved, but also the general US public. Therefore a qualitative interview study of 192 adults in a southeastern metropolitan area was done about 6 months after the 9/11 attacks. Participants were recruited and interviewed in diverse sites such as shopping malls, homes, coffee shops, parking lots, bookstores, and restaurant waiting areas. Only brief demographics were collected, due to the need to keep interviews 20 minutes long. To be less obtrusive, ethnographic field notes were used vs. audiotaping. Three questions were asked: What was it like for you at the time of the events of 9/11 and immediately thereafter? What is it like for you now? Has anything changed for you? A team of researchers used ethnographic analysis to isolate key themes and representative quotes. Participants were usually Caucasian (n=173) married (n=107) and employed; average age was 41 years (range=18-84). Thirty-two were students; others had a full range of occupations, with more in the human services fields. Findings of the study included thoughts and feelings: shock, confusion, disbelief and anger. Participants also had explanations people for why the events occurred, and were continuing to be a threat. Some had reactions to having close others affected or near the terrorist activities, (e.g., being in or having relatives in the military). A few said their lives had not changed; most did note changes, including in relationships, activities, travel and eating habits. The study provides significant insights about general population reactions to distant disastrous events and new threats and political processes that are being experienced in this historical period. The research serves as a preliminary study to needed longitudinal work to assess long-term changes after calamitous national events. AN: MN030179
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGeneral Public Responses to Terrorist Attack and Aftermathen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161440-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">General Public Responses to Terrorist Attack and Aftermath </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hall, Joanne</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">4309 Valdena Drive, Knoxville, TN, 37914, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Following the September 11 attacks there was the onset of war and bioterrorism. These three events affected not only those immediately involved, but also the general US public. Therefore a qualitative interview study of 192 adults in a southeastern metropolitan area was done about 6 months after the 9/11 attacks. Participants were recruited and interviewed in diverse sites such as shopping malls, homes, coffee shops, parking lots, bookstores, and restaurant waiting areas. Only brief demographics were collected, due to the need to keep interviews 20 minutes long. To be less obtrusive, ethnographic field notes were used vs. audiotaping. Three questions were asked: What was it like for you at the time of the events of 9/11 and immediately thereafter? What is it like for you now? Has anything changed for you? A team of researchers used ethnographic analysis to isolate key themes and representative quotes. Participants were usually Caucasian (n=173) married (n=107) and employed; average age was 41 years (range=18-84). Thirty-two were students; others had a full range of occupations, with more in the human services fields. Findings of the study included thoughts and feelings: shock, confusion, disbelief and anger. Participants also had explanations people for why the events occurred, and were continuing to be a threat. Some had reactions to having close others affected or near the terrorist activities, (e.g., being in or having relatives in the military). A few said their lives had not changed; most did note changes, including in relationships, activities, travel and eating habits. The study provides significant insights about general population reactions to distant disastrous events and new threats and political processes that are being experienced in this historical period. The research serves as a preliminary study to needed longitudinal work to assess long-term changes after calamitous national events. AN: MN030179 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:21:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:21:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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