Lived Experience of Pregnancy While Carrying a Child with a Known Congenital Abnormality

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161441
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Lived Experience of Pregnancy While Carrying a Child with a Known Congenital Abnormality
Abstract:
Lived Experience of Pregnancy While Carrying a Child with a Known Congenital Abnormality
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Hedrick, Jane
Contact Address:SON, 8015 Wenonga, Leawood, KS, 66206-1144, USA
Statement of the Problem: In the United States, 164 babies per 100,000 live births are born with congenital abnormalities. Although it is not known how many of the abnormalities are diagnosed prenatally, it is estimated that approximately 50% of all pregnant women now undergo some form of prenatal screening. It is important to gain an understanding of how prenatal diagnosis can impact the process of prenatal attachment for women facing the possibility of carrying, delivering and raising children with a congenital abnormality. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to describe the lived experience of prenatal attachment in mothers who are carrying a baby with a known congenital or genetic abnormality. Theoretical Framework: Attachment between infants and mothers can be traced back to attachment theory as described by Bowlby. Rubin stated it is the formation of a maternal identity that emotionally binds women to their children. She stated that this process is gradual and begins during pregnancy. No theories, however, address the impact that maternal knowledge of a non-lethal fetal abnormality has on prenatal attachment. Sample: The purposive sample consisted of fifteen women who had an in-utero diagnosis of a major congenital or genetic abnormality. Methodology: Data were collected through open-ended interviews. The data were analyzed according to Giorgi’s steps of phenomenological analysis. Results: The overall experience of prenatal attachment in pregnancies with maternal knowledge of congenital abnormalities is paradoxical. Themes that emerged from the interview data were: time is your friend, but also your enemy; you grieve, but you don’t grieve; and he’s not perfect, but he’s still mine. Conclusions: Health care providers need to recognize the paradoxical nature of prenatal attachment during pregnancies in which maternal knowledge of congenital or genetic abnormalities exists and support women’s prenatal attachment during this unique pregnancy. AN: MN030001
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLived Experience of Pregnancy While Carrying a Child with a Known Congenital Abnormalityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161441-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Lived Experience of Pregnancy While Carrying a Child with a Known Congenital Abnormality </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hedrick, Jane</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 8015 Wenonga, Leawood, KS, 66206-1144, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Statement of the Problem: In the United States, 164 babies per 100,000 live births are born with congenital abnormalities. Although it is not known how many of the abnormalities are diagnosed prenatally, it is estimated that approximately 50% of all pregnant women now undergo some form of prenatal screening. It is important to gain an understanding of how prenatal diagnosis can impact the process of prenatal attachment for women facing the possibility of carrying, delivering and raising children with a congenital abnormality. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to describe the lived experience of prenatal attachment in mothers who are carrying a baby with a known congenital or genetic abnormality. Theoretical Framework: Attachment between infants and mothers can be traced back to attachment theory as described by Bowlby. Rubin stated it is the formation of a maternal identity that emotionally binds women to their children. She stated that this process is gradual and begins during pregnancy. No theories, however, address the impact that maternal knowledge of a non-lethal fetal abnormality has on prenatal attachment. Sample: The purposive sample consisted of fifteen women who had an in-utero diagnosis of a major congenital or genetic abnormality. Methodology: Data were collected through open-ended interviews. The data were analyzed according to Giorgi&rsquo;s steps of phenomenological analysis. Results: The overall experience of prenatal attachment in pregnancies with maternal knowledge of congenital abnormalities is paradoxical. Themes that emerged from the interview data were: time is your friend, but also your enemy; you grieve, but you don&rsquo;t grieve; and he&rsquo;s not perfect, but he&rsquo;s still mine. Conclusions: Health care providers need to recognize the paradoxical nature of prenatal attachment during pregnancies in which maternal knowledge of congenital or genetic abnormalities exists and support women&rsquo;s prenatal attachment during this unique pregnancy. AN: MN030001</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:21:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:21:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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