2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161446
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Burden of the Physical and Emotional Work of Living with HIV
Abstract:
The Burden of the Physical and Emotional Work of Living with HIV
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Hildebrandt, Eugenie
Contact Address:SON, PO Box 413, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA
Co-Authors:Patricia Stevens; Sharon Garrett
Women in the United States make up 27 percent of individuals with HIV/AIDS and 31 percent of the new adult and adolescent cases of HIV reported between June 2000 and 2001. To reverse these trends for women, we need to understand their experiences of living with HIV. Design: Watson's concept of caring is the framework. Data will be presented from an in-depth, longitudinal study of 55 women living with HIV who was interviewed up to 10 times over a two-year period of time. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The population was women from urban and rural communities in Wisconsin who were infected with HIV. The sample was 53% African American, 36% Caucasian, 7% Hispanic, and 4%Native American. The mode of transmission for the women was 71% heterosexual sexual contact, 13% IV drug use, 11% sexual contact or drug use, and 7% through other sources such as tattoos or blood transfusions. Method: Purposive sampling was done to recruit women from urban and rural areas, from ethnic backgrounds representative of the HIV population in the state. Analysis: Our central analytic task was to evaluate the experiences of these women from the nursing perspective of the caring and care that they had or did not have at this crisis time in their illness. The themes that emerged from the narrative analysis were discovery of their HIV status, initial response to this previously unthinkable challenge, need for initial support, and other people's responses to their HIV status. The findings will assist nurses to understand and support women in effective ways during the early stages of their illness, and strengthen the ability of the women to effectively care for themselves within the community contexts in which they give and receive day-to-day nurturance or seek professional care. AN: MN030344
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Burden of the Physical and Emotional Work of Living with HIVen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161446-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Burden of the Physical and Emotional Work of Living with HIV </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hildebrandt, Eugenie</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, PO Box 413, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Patricia Stevens; Sharon Garrett</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Women in the United States make up 27 percent of individuals with HIV/AIDS and 31 percent of the new adult and adolescent cases of HIV reported between June 2000 and 2001. To reverse these trends for women, we need to understand their experiences of living with HIV. Design: Watson's concept of caring is the framework. Data will be presented from an in-depth, longitudinal study of 55 women living with HIV who was interviewed up to 10 times over a two-year period of time. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The population was women from urban and rural communities in Wisconsin who were infected with HIV. The sample was 53% African American, 36% Caucasian, 7% Hispanic, and 4%Native American. The mode of transmission for the women was 71% heterosexual sexual contact, 13% IV drug use, 11% sexual contact or drug use, and 7% through other sources such as tattoos or blood transfusions. Method: Purposive sampling was done to recruit women from urban and rural areas, from ethnic backgrounds representative of the HIV population in the state. Analysis: Our central analytic task was to evaluate the experiences of these women from the nursing perspective of the caring and care that they had or did not have at this crisis time in their illness. The themes that emerged from the narrative analysis were discovery of their HIV status, initial response to this previously unthinkable challenge, need for initial support, and other people's responses to their HIV status. The findings will assist nurses to understand and support women in effective ways during the early stages of their illness, and strengthen the ability of the women to effectively care for themselves within the community contexts in which they give and receive day-to-day nurturance or seek professional care. AN: MN030344 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:21:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:21:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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