2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161448
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Relaxation and Music Reduce Postoperative Pain in Cancer Patients
Abstract:
Relaxation and Music Reduce Postoperative Pain in Cancer Patients
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Huang, Shih-Tzu
Contact Address:SON, 3342 Ormond Road, Cleveland, OH, 44118, USA
Co-Authors:Yaewon Seo; Sukhee Ahn; Marion Good
We investigated the effect of three nonpharmacological nursing interventions on pain following cancer surgery. We hypothesized: patients who receive relaxation, music, or the combination of relaxation and music will have significantly less postoperative pain than those who do not. Using the Good and Moore theory, the study tested the proposition that nonpharmacological interventions reduce pain in addition to analgesic medication. In this RCT, interventions were tested in two activities, ambulation and rest, on two postoperative days. The study took place at two tertiary and two secondary hospitals in a large Midwestern city. The convenience sample was selected from pre-admission clinic schedules, and subjects were met there. There were 95 men and women, aged 33 to 70 years, scheduled for major intestinal surgery and planning to use patient controlled analgesia (PCA) and ambulate after surgery. Jaw relaxation, music and the combination were taught preoperatively with introductory tapes that explained the intervention and/or played five choices of sedative music. Interventions were tested postoperatively during ambulation and rest on days one and two. Pain sensation and distress were measured with VAS scales at three posttests during ambulation and one after 15 minutes of rest. MANCOVA indicated that the intervention groups had significantly less sensation and distress than the controls during 15 minutes of rest, p=.001, day one and, p=.002, day two. They also had significantly less after preparatory for ambulation on both days, p=.048, .000, and recovery from ambulation on day two, p=.0495, but not immediately after ambulation on either day. When effective, these interventions in cancer patients resulted in 22% to 40% less pain than controls. Nurses can provide soft music and relaxation at ambulation and rest on both days. AN: MN030302
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelaxation and Music Reduce Postoperative Pain in Cancer Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161448-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Relaxation and Music Reduce Postoperative Pain in Cancer Patients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Huang, Shih-Tzu</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 3342 Ormond Road, Cleveland, OH, 44118, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Yaewon Seo; Sukhee Ahn; Marion Good</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">We investigated the effect of three nonpharmacological nursing interventions on pain following cancer surgery. We hypothesized: patients who receive relaxation, music, or the combination of relaxation and music will have significantly less postoperative pain than those who do not. Using the Good and Moore theory, the study tested the proposition that nonpharmacological interventions reduce pain in addition to analgesic medication. In this RCT, interventions were tested in two activities, ambulation and rest, on two postoperative days. The study took place at two tertiary and two secondary hospitals in a large Midwestern city. The convenience sample was selected from pre-admission clinic schedules, and subjects were met there. There were 95 men and women, aged 33 to 70 years, scheduled for major intestinal surgery and planning to use patient controlled analgesia (PCA) and ambulate after surgery. Jaw relaxation, music and the combination were taught preoperatively with introductory tapes that explained the intervention and/or played five choices of sedative music. Interventions were tested postoperatively during ambulation and rest on days one and two. Pain sensation and distress were measured with VAS scales at three posttests during ambulation and one after 15 minutes of rest. MANCOVA indicated that the intervention groups had significantly less sensation and distress than the controls during 15 minutes of rest, p=.001, day one and, p=.002, day two. They also had significantly less after preparatory for ambulation on both days, p=.048, .000, and recovery from ambulation on day two, p=.0495, but not immediately after ambulation on either day. When effective, these interventions in cancer patients resulted in 22% to 40% less pain than controls. Nurses can provide soft music and relaxation at ambulation and rest on both days. AN: MN030302 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:21:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:21:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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