The Effects of Informal Social Support and Coping of Family Caregivers of Elders with Dementia in Taiwan

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161449
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effects of Informal Social Support and Coping of Family Caregivers of Elders with Dementia in Taiwan
Abstract:
The Effects of Informal Social Support and Coping of Family Caregivers of Elders with Dementia in Taiwan
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Huang, Chiung-Yu
Contact Address:Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 1939 Green Road. # 615, Cleveland, OH, 44121, USA
As the numbers of elders increase so do the numbers of individuals facing chronic or serious illness, or disabling conditions requiring long term care. Family caregivers providing a major portion of caregiving often experience stress related to the deleterious consequences for physical and mental health outcomes. Support from family, friends, and paid-in-home services may help to minimize negative health outcomes of family caregivers. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship of demographic (age, gender, income), situational factors (caregiving duration, caregiver relationship to the care recipient, care recipient's behavioral problems, and paid-in-home assistants), social support, and coping on the health outcomes (depressive symptoms, general health perceptions) of family caregivers of elderly persons with dementia in Taiwan. This study also examined stress and whether social support moderated and coping mediated the relationship between stress and caregiver's health. Lazarus and Folkman's Stress model guided this study. The model based, descriptive cross-sectional study recruited subjects who were primary family caregivers of elders with dementia from the Family Caregiver Association and two nursing homes in the south of Taiwan. A convenience sample of 148 participants participated in face-to-face interviews. Data were collected using a demographic questionnaire, the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale, and the General Health Perceptions subscale of the Short Form 36-Health Survey, the Care Recipient Behavioral Problem Scale, the Revised Ways of Coping Scale, and the Inventory of Social Supportive Behaviors Scale. Data analysis included correlation and multiple regression analysis. The findings indicated that younger, more paid-in-home assistants, longer duration had better health. Female, less income, less paid-in-home assistants had a greater level of depressive symptoms. In addition, mediating effect of active coping was supported in this study. The findings from this study provide a basis for nurses to develop interventions that minimize the negative impacts on family caregivers. AN: MN030345
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effects of Informal Social Support and Coping of Family Caregivers of Elders with Dementia in Taiwanen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161449-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effects of Informal Social Support and Coping of Family Caregivers of Elders with Dementia in Taiwan</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Huang, Chiung-Yu</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 1939 Green Road. # 615, Cleveland, OH, 44121, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">As the numbers of elders increase so do the numbers of individuals facing chronic or serious illness, or disabling conditions requiring long term care. Family caregivers providing a major portion of caregiving often experience stress related to the deleterious consequences for physical and mental health outcomes. Support from family, friends, and paid-in-home services may help to minimize negative health outcomes of family caregivers. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship of demographic (age, gender, income), situational factors (caregiving duration, caregiver relationship to the care recipient, care recipient's behavioral problems, and paid-in-home assistants), social support, and coping on the health outcomes (depressive symptoms, general health perceptions) of family caregivers of elderly persons with dementia in Taiwan. This study also examined stress and whether social support moderated and coping mediated the relationship between stress and caregiver's health. Lazarus and Folkman's Stress model guided this study. The model based, descriptive cross-sectional study recruited subjects who were primary family caregivers of elders with dementia from the Family Caregiver Association and two nursing homes in the south of Taiwan. A convenience sample of 148 participants participated in face-to-face interviews. Data were collected using a demographic questionnaire, the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale, and the General Health Perceptions subscale of the Short Form 36-Health Survey, the Care Recipient Behavioral Problem Scale, the Revised Ways of Coping Scale, and the Inventory of Social Supportive Behaviors Scale. Data analysis included correlation and multiple regression analysis. The findings indicated that younger, more paid-in-home assistants, longer duration had better health. Female, less income, less paid-in-home assistants had a greater level of depressive symptoms. In addition, mediating effect of active coping was supported in this study. The findings from this study provide a basis for nurses to develop interventions that minimize the negative impacts on family caregivers. AN: MN030345 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:21:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:21:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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