Influencing Factors on Influenza Immunization Among Employees in an Acute, Tertiary Care Facility in the Midwest

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161450
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Influencing Factors on Influenza Immunization Among Employees in an Acute, Tertiary Care Facility in the Midwest
Abstract:
Influencing Factors on Influenza Immunization Among Employees in an Acute, Tertiary Care Facility in the Midwest
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Imamura, Emiko
Contact Address:WON, 723 Lawrence #3, Ann Arbor, MI, 48104-1263, USA
Purpose: The outcomes of hospital-wide influenza vaccination are effective in terms of reduced mortality. However, there is reported low compliance with obtaining the vaccination among healthcare workers. This study was implemented to identify factors that influenced 122 employees in a 900-bed acute, tertiary care, academic, urban hospital in the Midwest to receive or not to receive an influenza immunization. Conceptual framework: A 14-item questionnaire was developed based on findings of Eisenfeld’s (1994) employees’ perceptions regarding influenza vaccination. The framework definitions of the questionnaire were modified from the PRECEDE-PROCEED model. Subjects: A convenience sample of hospital employees was obtained at five hospital units and the Employee Health Service, where vaccinations were administered. Everyone who was vaccinated was included in the study and additional participants were employees in the clinical sites who were not receiving the vaccine. A comparison of influences was made among physicians (n=33), nurses (19), support staff (28), and indirect care workers (42). Methods: A chi-square test was employed to determine significant relationships among the study variables. Results: The employees’ willingness to receive the vaccination and having received it in the previous year were significantly correlated (?²=23.79, p ? .010). Employees who didn’t receive the immunization were more concerned about pain from the injection (?²=6.15, p=.046) and fear of getting influenza from the vaccine (?²=18.02, p=.000). Support staff was more concerned about side-effects (?²=13.36, p=.038). Conclusions: Education regarding safety of the influenza vaccine and treatment of side-effects could reduce fear associated with the vaccine and increase the number of hospital employees who become immunized. AN: MN030203
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInfluencing Factors on Influenza Immunization Among Employees in an Acute, Tertiary Care Facility in the Midwesten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161450-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Influencing Factors on Influenza Immunization Among Employees in an Acute, Tertiary Care Facility in the Midwest </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Imamura, Emiko</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">WON, 723 Lawrence #3, Ann Arbor, MI, 48104-1263, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The outcomes of hospital-wide influenza vaccination are effective in terms of reduced mortality. However, there is reported low compliance with obtaining the vaccination among healthcare workers. This study was implemented to identify factors that influenced 122 employees in a 900-bed acute, tertiary care, academic, urban hospital in the Midwest to receive or not to receive an influenza immunization. Conceptual framework: A 14-item questionnaire was developed based on findings of Eisenfeld&rsquo;s (1994) employees&rsquo; perceptions regarding influenza vaccination. The framework definitions of the questionnaire were modified from the PRECEDE-PROCEED model. Subjects: A convenience sample of hospital employees was obtained at five hospital units and the Employee Health Service, where vaccinations were administered. Everyone who was vaccinated was included in the study and additional participants were employees in the clinical sites who were not receiving the vaccine. A comparison of influences was made among physicians (n=33), nurses (19), support staff (28), and indirect care workers (42). Methods: A chi-square test was employed to determine significant relationships among the study variables. Results: The employees&rsquo; willingness to receive the vaccination and having received it in the previous year were significantly correlated (?&sup2;=23.79, p ? .010). Employees who didn&rsquo;t receive the immunization were more concerned about pain from the injection (?&sup2;=6.15, p=.046) and fear of getting influenza from the vaccine (?&sup2;=18.02, p=.000). Support staff was more concerned about side-effects (?&sup2;=13.36, p=.038). Conclusions: Education regarding safety of the influenza vaccine and treatment of side-effects could reduce fear associated with the vaccine and increase the number of hospital employees who become immunized. AN: MN030203 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:21:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:21:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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