Psychosocial Obstetrical Profile (POP) for Preterm Birth Among African-American and Caucasian Low-income Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161451
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Psychosocial Obstetrical Profile (POP) for Preterm Birth Among African-American and Caucasian Low-income Women
Abstract:
Psychosocial Obstetrical Profile (POP) for Preterm Birth Among African-American and Caucasian Low-income Women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Jesse, Elizabeth
Contact Address:SON, 1337 Johnson Hall, West Lafayette, IN, 47907, USA
African-American women continue to have a high incidence of preterm and low birth weight infants. Reducing these adverse outcomes is a national goal set by Healthy People 2010. The purpose of this study, guided by key concepts from Jesse's Holistic Obstetrical Problem Evaluation (HOPE) theory, is to examine the relationship among absence of social support, self-esteem, depression, attitude towards pregnancy, and preterm and low birth weight infants. This study will use a prospective correlational research design with a convenience sample of 130 pregnant low-income culturally diverse women. These women will be recruited from prenatal clinics in an urban community. Face-to-face interviews will be conducted with the women to administer standardized and reliable instruments. Additional data collection will include socio-demographic and biophysical factors. Birth outcomes will be obtained from hospital records. Multiple and logistic regression analysis will be conducted to determine factors predictive of preterm and low birth weight infants. This discovery is essential to plan preventive interventions and to develop health care delivery systems concerned with cost effectiveness. In addition nurse researchers need to determine the effect of the unique contributions that nurse practitioners and nurse-midwives incorporate in prenatal care to improve birth outcomes. AN: MN030286
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePsychosocial Obstetrical Profile (POP) for Preterm Birth Among African-American and Caucasian Low-income Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161451-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Psychosocial Obstetrical Profile (POP) for Preterm Birth Among African-American and Caucasian Low-income Women </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jesse, Elizabeth</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 1337 Johnson Hall, West Lafayette, IN, 47907, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">African-American women continue to have a high incidence of preterm and low birth weight infants. Reducing these adverse outcomes is a national goal set by Healthy People 2010. The purpose of this study, guided by key concepts from Jesse's Holistic Obstetrical Problem Evaluation (HOPE) theory, is to examine the relationship among absence of social support, self-esteem, depression, attitude towards pregnancy, and preterm and low birth weight infants. This study will use a prospective correlational research design with a convenience sample of 130 pregnant low-income culturally diverse women. These women will be recruited from prenatal clinics in an urban community. Face-to-face interviews will be conducted with the women to administer standardized and reliable instruments. Additional data collection will include socio-demographic and biophysical factors. Birth outcomes will be obtained from hospital records. Multiple and logistic regression analysis will be conducted to determine factors predictive of preterm and low birth weight infants. This discovery is essential to plan preventive interventions and to develop health care delivery systems concerned with cost effectiveness. In addition nurse researchers need to determine the effect of the unique contributions that nurse practitioners and nurse-midwives incorporate in prenatal care to improve birth outcomes. AN: MN030286 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:21:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:21:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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