2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161453
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Paternal involvement among African-American non-resident fathers
Abstract:
Paternal involvement among African-American non-resident fathers
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Julion, Wrenetha
Contact Address:CON, 600 S. Paulina Street, Suite 1080,, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Current social policies for increasing the involvement of African-American non-resident (AANR) fathers in the lives of their children have largely evolved from research with European-American divorced fathers, single mothers and the media. Little is known about paternal involvement (PI) from the perspective of AANR fathers, themselves. The result has been the development of social policies that have done little to increase AANR father involvement with their children. The purpose of this study was to describe PI from the perspective of a diverse group of AANR fathers. The theoretical framework used for this study, Billingsley’s African American Family Model, focuses on the role of context and cultural values in determining AA men’s parental involvement. The sample consisted of 295 AANR fathers from diverse socioeconomic backgrounds who had a biological child (<18 years old) with whom they did not live on a full time basis. The study was conducted in 3 phases: (1) 7 focus groups were conducted with AANR fathers to identify themes of involvement that were then used to develop a survey of paternal involvement, (2) this survey was then piloted with 5 expert fatherhood researchers and 15 AANR fathers, and (3) the final survey was administered to a diverse group of 211 AANR fathers. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, ANOVA and regression analyses. The results indicated that AANR fathers are involved in multiple ways with their children. In addition, the AANR fathers in this study identified 5 culturally-focused conceptualizations of PI not previously identified in the literature (providing non-monetary support, participating in special celebrations and rituals, helping the child feel proud of being African-American, helping the child deal with the “outside” world, and being a role-model). This research has important implications for family nursing research since it provides valuable insight into a serious social concern- absent fathers AN: MN030257
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePaternal involvement among African-American non-resident fathersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161453-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Paternal involvement among African-American non-resident fathers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Julion, Wrenetha</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 600 S. Paulina Street, Suite 1080,, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Current social policies for increasing the involvement of African-American non-resident (AANR) fathers in the lives of their children have largely evolved from research with European-American divorced fathers, single mothers and the media. Little is known about paternal involvement (PI) from the perspective of AANR fathers, themselves. The result has been the development of social policies that have done little to increase AANR father involvement with their children. The purpose of this study was to describe PI from the perspective of a diverse group of AANR fathers. The theoretical framework used for this study, Billingsley&rsquo;s African American Family Model, focuses on the role of context and cultural values in determining AA men&rsquo;s parental involvement. The sample consisted of 295 AANR fathers from diverse socioeconomic backgrounds who had a biological child (&lt;18 years old) with whom they did not live on a full time basis. The study was conducted in 3 phases: (1) 7 focus groups were conducted with AANR fathers to identify themes of involvement that were then used to develop a survey of paternal involvement, (2) this survey was then piloted with 5 expert fatherhood researchers and 15 AANR fathers, and (3) the final survey was administered to a diverse group of 211 AANR fathers. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, ANOVA and regression analyses. The results indicated that AANR fathers are involved in multiple ways with their children. In addition, the AANR fathers in this study identified 5 culturally-focused conceptualizations of PI not previously identified in the literature (providing non-monetary support, participating in special celebrations and rituals, helping the child feel proud of being African-American, helping the child deal with the &ldquo;outside&rdquo; world, and being a role-model). This research has important implications for family nursing research since it provides valuable insight into a serious social concern- absent fathers AN: MN030257 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:21:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:21:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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