2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161456
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Computerized Technology Adoption for Medication Safety
Abstract:
Computerized Technology Adoption for Medication Safety
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Ketchum, Kathy
Contact Address:SON, Box 1066, Edwardsville, IL, 62026-1066, USA
Co-Authors:Kay E. Gaehle
The Institute of Medicine (IOM) (Kohn, Corrigan, & Donaldson, 2000) recently provided evidence that approximately 7000 deaths per year in the United States can be attributed to preventable medication errors. Medication errors leading to deaths arise from adverse drug events (ADE’s) that usually involve a multitude of preventable system failures. System-related IOM strategies for reducing medication errors and improving patient safety include clarifying physician prescription orders and making patient information available at the bedside. Several new technologies have been identified that operationalize these strategies and may help prevent errors, such as computerized physician order entry (CPOE), automated medication dispensing systems (AMD’s), and barcoding for medication administration (BCMA) with computerized charting. This paper provides a brief overview of these technologies with a focus on a pilot research project evaluating the implementation of a BCMA system, the Pyxis Veri5, on an oncology unit in a Midwest community hospital. The study design includes qualitative interviews, surveys, and an evaluation of medication administration time before and after implementation of the barcode scanning. The theoretical framework for the study is the organizational stages of Roger’s Diffusion of Innovation Model. The pre-implementation portions of the pilot project were completed. Data collection on the remaining portions of the project is ongoing. Current findings from the project, as well as factors that facilitated implementation and barriers to implementation will be identified. The intent of the investigators is to finish the pilot project and then evaluate the project more thoroughly as it is implemented throughout the hospital. Implications of this technology on patient safety, as well as nursing administration, clinical practice, and education will be discussed.] AN: MN030109
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComputerized Technology Adoption for Medication Safetyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161456-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Computerized Technology Adoption for Medication Safety </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ketchum, Kathy</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, Box 1066, Edwardsville, IL, 62026-1066, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kay E. Gaehle</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The Institute of Medicine (IOM) (Kohn, Corrigan, &amp; Donaldson, 2000) recently provided evidence that approximately 7000 deaths per year in the United States can be attributed to preventable medication errors. Medication errors leading to deaths arise from adverse drug events (ADE&rsquo;s) that usually involve a multitude of preventable system failures. System-related IOM strategies for reducing medication errors and improving patient safety include clarifying physician prescription orders and making patient information available at the bedside. Several new technologies have been identified that operationalize these strategies and may help prevent errors, such as computerized physician order entry (CPOE), automated medication dispensing systems (AMD&rsquo;s), and barcoding for medication administration (BCMA) with computerized charting. This paper provides a brief overview of these technologies with a focus on a pilot research project evaluating the implementation of a BCMA system, the Pyxis Veri5, on an oncology unit in a Midwest community hospital. The study design includes qualitative interviews, surveys, and an evaluation of medication administration time before and after implementation of the barcode scanning. The theoretical framework for the study is the organizational stages of Roger&rsquo;s Diffusion of Innovation Model. The pre-implementation portions of the pilot project were completed. Data collection on the remaining portions of the project is ongoing. Current findings from the project, as well as factors that facilitated implementation and barriers to implementation will be identified. The intent of the investigators is to finish the pilot project and then evaluate the project more thoroughly as it is implemented throughout the hospital. Implications of this technology on patient safety, as well as nursing administration, clinical practice, and education will be discussed.] AN: MN030109 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:21:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:21:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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