2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161463
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Self-Care Interventions for HIV+ Women Going Home From Prison
Abstract:
Self-Care Interventions for HIV+ Women Going Home From Prison
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Leenerts, Mary
Contact Address:3901 Rainbow Blvd, SON Room 3066, Kansas City, KS, 66160, USA
Studies reported by the Bureau of Justice Statistics reveal that incarcerated women have many physical and mental health problems. Research addressing the self-care practices of HIV+ incarcerated women is significant because neglect of self-care results in HIV risk behaviors that affect HIV progression and transmission. This study describes the problem of self-care in HIV+ incarcerated women and proposes interventions to support self-care after release. DESIGN: Self-care of HIV+ incarcerated women was investigated in this grounded theory study. Specific Aims: (a) To explore women’s perceptions of the meanings and behaviors of self-care and (b) To identify factors that enhance or constrain self-care. The purpose was to develop middle range nursing theory that sustains self-care practices as women transition from prison into the community. SETTING: A state prison in the southeastern United States. SAMPLE: 22 HIV+ women who spoke and understood English; eighteen women were African American and four were Euro American. DATA COLLECTION: Data were collected through audio-taped interviews and a demographic information form. DATA ANALYSIS: Constant comparative analysis with three levels of coding (open, selective, and theoretical). FINDINGS: Factors that enhance or constrain self-care were captured in a social-psychological process that developed over time in four phases: (a) Phase I, Recurring Images of Abuse, exposes relational violence as a factor that disconnects women from self-care; (b) Phase II, Repeating Harmful Coping Behaviors, describes unhealthy consequences of self-care neglect; (c) Phase III, Refocusing Attention on Self, communicates the shock of incarceration and HIV infection and illustrates the shift in focus to self-care; and Phase IV, Reshaping Connections in Relationships, proposes interventions that enhance and sustain self-care practices. Self-care requires practicing self-care within as well as having protective relationships and safe environments. The theory of interventions for promoting self-care will be discussed with emphasis on: Establishing Safety, Reconstructing the Self, and Restoring Connections with Family and Community. AN: MN030323
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSelf-Care Interventions for HIV+ Women Going Home From Prisonen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161463-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Self-Care Interventions for HIV+ Women Going Home From Prison </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Leenerts, Mary</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3901 Rainbow Blvd, SON Room 3066, Kansas City, KS, 66160, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Studies reported by the Bureau of Justice Statistics reveal that incarcerated women have many physical and mental health problems. Research addressing the self-care practices of HIV+ incarcerated women is significant because neglect of self-care results in HIV risk behaviors that affect HIV progression and transmission. This study describes the problem of self-care in HIV+ incarcerated women and proposes interventions to support self-care after release. DESIGN: Self-care of HIV+ incarcerated women was investigated in this grounded theory study. Specific Aims: (a) To explore women&rsquo;s perceptions of the meanings and behaviors of self-care and (b) To identify factors that enhance or constrain self-care. The purpose was to develop middle range nursing theory that sustains self-care practices as women transition from prison into the community. SETTING: A state prison in the southeastern United States. SAMPLE: 22 HIV+ women who spoke and understood English; eighteen women were African American and four were Euro American. DATA COLLECTION: Data were collected through audio-taped interviews and a demographic information form. DATA ANALYSIS: Constant comparative analysis with three levels of coding (open, selective, and theoretical). FINDINGS: Factors that enhance or constrain self-care were captured in a social-psychological process that developed over time in four phases: (a) Phase I, Recurring Images of Abuse, exposes relational violence as a factor that disconnects women from self-care; (b) Phase II, Repeating Harmful Coping Behaviors, describes unhealthy consequences of self-care neglect; (c) Phase III, Refocusing Attention on Self, communicates the shock of incarceration and HIV infection and illustrates the shift in focus to self-care; and Phase IV, Reshaping Connections in Relationships, proposes interventions that enhance and sustain self-care practices. Self-care requires practicing self-care within as well as having protective relationships and safe environments. The theory of interventions for promoting self-care will be discussed with emphasis on: Establishing Safety, Reconstructing the Self, and Restoring Connections with Family and Community. AN: MN030323 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:21:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:21:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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