The Relationship between Body Composition and Bone Mineral Density in Perimenopausal Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161465
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Relationship between Body Composition and Bone Mineral Density in Perimenopausal Women
Abstract:
The Relationship between Body Composition and Bone Mineral Density in Perimenopausal Women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Li , Suling
Contact Address:SON, 2160 S. 1st Ave, Bldg 105, Rm 2840, Maywood, IL, 60153, USA
Co-Authors:Robert Wagner; Karyn Holm; Jaimie Lehotsky; Colleen Keough; Michael Zinaman
Perimenopause marks the beginning of an accelerated bone loss process, contributing to the development of osteoporosis, a major public health problem. Perimenopause has been associated with a decrease in body lean mass, and an increase in fat mass, abdominal fat mass, and weight. How the changes in fat mass and lean mass during perimenopause may influence bone mineral density (BMD) is currently unknown. The purpose of this study is to determine the independent effect and relative contribution of lean mass and fat mass to bone mineral mass in perimenopausal women. The sample consisted of 43 sedentary perimenopausal women (age: mean=49.6; SD: 3.2) with an intact uterus and ovaries, participating in a study of exercise and perimenopausal symptoms. Total body BMD, regional BMD, and soft-tissue body composition was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Other measures including age, height, weight, and serum FSH and E2 were also obtained. Findings revealed that 14% of perimenopausal women in this sample had low bone mass (osteopenia) in the lumbar spine and/or the femoral neck. HRT was inversely associated with BMD only in the femoral neck, yet the relationship disappeared after adjusting the effect of weight. Overall body fat mass and lean mass had positive relationships with BMD of lumber spine and the femoral neck. However, using multiple regression analyses with fat mass, lean mass, ethnicity and height as independent variables, only lean mass (beta=.62) and ethnicity (beta=.36) remained significant predictors for BMD of the femoral neck (r2=53%). Ethnicity was the sole predictor of lumbar spine BMD (beta=.33; R2=36%). Fat mass was not a significant predictor of BMD at any skeleton site. These findings suggest that body lean mass, not fat mass, is a significant contributor of BMD of the femoral neck in perimenopausal women. AN: MN030354
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Relationship between Body Composition and Bone Mineral Density in Perimenopausal Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161465-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Relationship between Body Composition and Bone Mineral Density in Perimenopausal Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Li , Suling</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 2160 S. 1st Ave, Bldg 105, Rm 2840, Maywood, IL, 60153, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Robert Wagner; Karyn Holm; Jaimie Lehotsky; Colleen Keough; Michael Zinaman </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Perimenopause marks the beginning of an accelerated bone loss process, contributing to the development of osteoporosis, a major public health problem. Perimenopause has been associated with a decrease in body lean mass, and an increase in fat mass, abdominal fat mass, and weight. How the changes in fat mass and lean mass during perimenopause may influence bone mineral density (BMD) is currently unknown. The purpose of this study is to determine the independent effect and relative contribution of lean mass and fat mass to bone mineral mass in perimenopausal women. The sample consisted of 43 sedentary perimenopausal women (age: mean=49.6; SD: 3.2) with an intact uterus and ovaries, participating in a study of exercise and perimenopausal symptoms. Total body BMD, regional BMD, and soft-tissue body composition was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Other measures including age, height, weight, and serum FSH and E2 were also obtained. Findings revealed that 14% of perimenopausal women in this sample had low bone mass (osteopenia) in the lumbar spine and/or the femoral neck. HRT was inversely associated with BMD only in the femoral neck, yet the relationship disappeared after adjusting the effect of weight. Overall body fat mass and lean mass had positive relationships with BMD of lumber spine and the femoral neck. However, using multiple regression analyses with fat mass, lean mass, ethnicity and height as independent variables, only lean mass (beta=.62) and ethnicity (beta=.36) remained significant predictors for BMD of the femoral neck (r2=53%). Ethnicity was the sole predictor of lumbar spine BMD (beta=.33; R2=36%). Fat mass was not a significant predictor of BMD at any skeleton site. These findings suggest that body lean mass, not fat mass, is a significant contributor of BMD of the femoral neck in perimenopausal women. AN: MN030354 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:21:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:21:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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