Knowledge, Attitudes, and Predictors of Advance Directive Discussion Practices of Registered Nurses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161466
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Knowledge, Attitudes, and Predictors of Advance Directive Discussion Practices of Registered Nurses
Abstract:
Knowledge, Attitudes, and Predictors of Advance Directive Discussion Practices of Registered Nurses
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Lipson, Amy
Contact Address:Frances Payne Bolton SON, 0900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA
Co-Authors:Patricia A. Higgins
Although people have favorable views regarding advance directives, few Americans complete the documents. Lack of discussions between patients and health care providers is one factor contributing to low advance directive completion rates. The literature has largely ignored factors that may influence nurses to engage in discussions about end-of-life issues, including advance directives. The purpose of this cross sectional study was to determine nurses’ knowledge, attitudes, and experiences (i.e. discussions with patients) regarding advance directives. This study also investigated nurses’ exposures to advance directives with regard to their personal, educational, and professional experiences. A second purpose was to examine predictors of advance directive discussions between nurses and patients. Seven hundred and nineteen respondents, randomly selected from a list of Registered Nurses in the State of Ohio, completed mailed questionnaires during the summer of 2000. The 52-item questionnaire was created from three existing instruments (Crego & Lipp, 1998; Downe-Wamboldt, Butler, & Coughlan, 1998; Hughes & Singer, 1992) plus the author's items. Descriptive, t test, chi-square, and logistic regression statistics were used in the data analyses. Overall, the respondents were knowledgeable and possessed positive attitudes about advance directives. Over half the sample perceived advance directive discussions as one of their nursing roles. Knowledge, positive attitudes, exposure to advance directive information during and outside of formal nursing education, employment in a home health care agency, and identification of “clinical” as the role in a practice setting were all associated with respondents’ higher reported levels of advance directive discussions with patients. Higher self-perceived confidence in advance directive discussion skills and the experience of caring for at least one patient with a current advance directive were found to be significant predictors of advance directive discussions. AN: MN030208
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleKnowledge, Attitudes, and Predictors of Advance Directive Discussion Practices of Registered Nursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161466-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Knowledge, Attitudes, and Predictors of Advance Directive Discussion Practices of Registered Nurses </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lipson, Amy</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Frances Payne Bolton SON, 0900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Patricia A. Higgins</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Although people have favorable views regarding advance directives, few Americans complete the documents. Lack of discussions between patients and health care providers is one factor contributing to low advance directive completion rates. The literature has largely ignored factors that may influence nurses to engage in discussions about end-of-life issues, including advance directives. The purpose of this cross sectional study was to determine nurses&rsquo; knowledge, attitudes, and experiences (i.e. discussions with patients) regarding advance directives. This study also investigated nurses&rsquo; exposures to advance directives with regard to their personal, educational, and professional experiences. A second purpose was to examine predictors of advance directive discussions between nurses and patients. Seven hundred and nineteen respondents, randomly selected from a list of Registered Nurses in the State of Ohio, completed mailed questionnaires during the summer of 2000. The 52-item questionnaire was created from three existing instruments (Crego &amp; Lipp, 1998; Downe-Wamboldt, Butler, &amp; Coughlan, 1998; Hughes &amp; Singer, 1992) plus the author's items. Descriptive, t test, chi-square, and logistic regression statistics were used in the data analyses. Overall, the respondents were knowledgeable and possessed positive attitudes about advance directives. Over half the sample perceived advance directive discussions as one of their nursing roles. Knowledge, positive attitudes, exposure to advance directive information during and outside of formal nursing education, employment in a home health care agency, and identification of &ldquo;clinical&rdquo; as the role in a practice setting were all associated with respondents&rsquo; higher reported levels of advance directive discussions with patients. Higher self-perceived confidence in advance directive discussion skills and the experience of caring for at least one patient with a current advance directive were found to be significant predictors of advance directive discussions. AN: MN030208 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:21:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:21:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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