2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161467
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Adverse Events in Home Healthcare
Abstract:
Adverse Events in Home Healthcare
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Madigan, Elizabeth
Contact Address:7609 Mountain Park Dr, Concord Twp, OH, 44060, USA
Co-Authors:Susan Tullai-McGuinness
Patient safety is taking on increasing importance, in part following the publication by the Institute of Medicine report, To Err is Human, which documented the extent of adverse events that occur in healthcare settings. Within home healthcare, there has been relatively little research on adverse events. Within the last three years, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has mandated a list of 13 adverse events for home healthcare agencies to use as part of their quality improvement programs. The adverse events are derived from the Outcomes and Assessment Information Set, which is required for use in home healthcare settings. The purpose of this study was to determine the most frequent adverse events in home healthcare agencies for two quarters (October through December 2000 and January through March 2001). Forty three agencies from two states (Ohio and Michigan) provided their adverse event reports. Results: The most frequent events for the first quarter were unexpected death (3.4%), emergent care for injury caused by a fall at home (1.7%), and emergent care for wound infections (1.6%). The most frequent adverse events for the second quarter were an increase in the number of pressure ulcers (1.9%), development of a urinary tract infection (1.4%) emergent care for injury caused by falls at home (1.4%), and emergent care for wound infections and deteriorating wound status (1.4%). There was change in the type and quantity of adverse events from the first quarter to the second, possibly because of a learning curve associated with a new reporting system. Conclusions: These 13 adverse events occur relatively infrequently and there are likely to be other adverse events that are occurring but are not being captured in the reporting. This study represents the first that collected information from a number of agencies. AN: MN030076
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdverse Events in Home Healthcareen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161467-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Adverse Events in Home Healthcare</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Madigan, Elizabeth</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">7609 Mountain Park Dr, Concord Twp, OH, 44060, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Susan Tullai-McGuinness</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Patient safety is taking on increasing importance, in part following the publication by the Institute of Medicine report, To Err is Human, which documented the extent of adverse events that occur in healthcare settings. Within home healthcare, there has been relatively little research on adverse events. Within the last three years, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has mandated a list of 13 adverse events for home healthcare agencies to use as part of their quality improvement programs. The adverse events are derived from the Outcomes and Assessment Information Set, which is required for use in home healthcare settings. The purpose of this study was to determine the most frequent adverse events in home healthcare agencies for two quarters (October through December 2000 and January through March 2001). Forty three agencies from two states (Ohio and Michigan) provided their adverse event reports. Results: The most frequent events for the first quarter were unexpected death (3.4%), emergent care for injury caused by a fall at home (1.7%), and emergent care for wound infections (1.6%). The most frequent adverse events for the second quarter were an increase in the number of pressure ulcers (1.9%), development of a urinary tract infection (1.4%) emergent care for injury caused by falls at home (1.4%), and emergent care for wound infections and deteriorating wound status (1.4%). There was change in the type and quantity of adverse events from the first quarter to the second, possibly because of a learning curve associated with a new reporting system. Conclusions: These 13 adverse events occur relatively infrequently and there are likely to be other adverse events that are occurring but are not being captured in the reporting. This study represents the first that collected information from a number of agencies. AN: MN030076 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:21:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:21:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.