Types and Numbers of Chronic Conditions, Functional Status, and Acceptance of Chronic Conditions in Black and White Older Adults

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161470
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Types and Numbers of Chronic Conditions, Functional Status, and Acceptance of Chronic Conditions in Black and White Older Adults
Abstract:
Types and Numbers of Chronic Conditions, Functional Status, and Acceptance of Chronic Conditions in Black and White Older Adults
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:McDonald, Patricia
Contact Address:Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA
Co-Authors:Jaclene A. Zauszniewski; Abir Bekhet; Karen Krafcik; Laura DeHelian; Diana L. Morris
Aging increases vulnerability to chronic illness and approximately 75% of older adults have at least one chronic disease. Although 69% of elders report their health as better than fair, they may be reluctant to acknowledge the full extent of the deficits and limitations that are due to their chronic conditions. Acceptance of the loss of physical functioning along with the psychological and social implications of not being fully functional can be an overwhelming challenge for elders. In addition, health disparities between Black and White elders continue to be documented despite recent advances. Within the context of Wright’s (1960) theory on the process of acceptance of health problems and disabilities, this descriptive, comparative study examined the differences in types and numbers of chronic conditions, functional status, and acceptance of chronic conditions in a sample of 12 Black and 50 White older adults living in retirement communities. Data were obtained from the first wave of a 4-year NINR-funded clinical trial. Study participants completed measures of the study variables during face-to-face interviews. Although no differences between Black and White elders were found for the number or acceptance of chronic conditions, all of the Blacks reported having high blood pressure and 76% of the Whites most frequently reported having arthritis. Black elders reported higher levels of functioning than Whites (c2=5.36, p=.02). While acceptance and the number of chronic conditions were not associated, greater acceptance was correlated with better functioning (r=-.514, p=.01); poorer functioning was correlated with a greater number of chronic conditions (r=.257, p=.05). Investigation of racial differences is important so that more culturally sensitive nursing interventions can be developed for older adults in society within and across racial groups. AN: MN030362
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTypes and Numbers of Chronic Conditions, Functional Status, and Acceptance of Chronic Conditions in Black and White Older Adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161470-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Types and Numbers of Chronic Conditions, Functional Status, and Acceptance of Chronic Conditions in Black and White Older Adults</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McDonald, Patricia</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jaclene A. Zauszniewski; Abir Bekhet; Karen Krafcik; Laura DeHelian; Diana L. Morris </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Aging increases vulnerability to chronic illness and approximately 75% of older adults have at least one chronic disease. Although 69% of elders report their health as better than fair, they may be reluctant to acknowledge the full extent of the deficits and limitations that are due to their chronic conditions. Acceptance of the loss of physical functioning along with the psychological and social implications of not being fully functional can be an overwhelming challenge for elders. In addition, health disparities between Black and White elders continue to be documented despite recent advances. Within the context of Wright&rsquo;s (1960) theory on the process of acceptance of health problems and disabilities, this descriptive, comparative study examined the differences in types and numbers of chronic conditions, functional status, and acceptance of chronic conditions in a sample of 12 Black and 50 White older adults living in retirement communities. Data were obtained from the first wave of a 4-year NINR-funded clinical trial. Study participants completed measures of the study variables during face-to-face interviews. Although no differences between Black and White elders were found for the number or acceptance of chronic conditions, all of the Blacks reported having high blood pressure and 76% of the Whites most frequently reported having arthritis. Black elders reported higher levels of functioning than Whites (c2=5.36, p=.02). While acceptance and the number of chronic conditions were not associated, greater acceptance was correlated with better functioning (r=-.514, p=.01); poorer functioning was correlated with a greater number of chronic conditions (r=.257, p=.05). Investigation of racial differences is important so that more culturally sensitive nursing interventions can be developed for older adults in society within and across racial groups. AN: MN030362 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:21:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:21:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.