2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161471
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Post-Immigration Family Relationships and Depression in Midlife Women
Abstract:
Post-Immigration Family Relationships and Depression in Midlife Women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Miller, Arlene
Contact Address:CON, 845 South Damen, Room 1016, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Co-Authors:Peggy Chandler; Olga Sorokin; Suzanne Feetham
This study examines family adaptation, demographic characteristics, and depression in women who immigrated from the former Soviet Union (FSU). Data are from a larger longitudinal study of acculturation, family adaptation, and post-immigration health and well-being. Conceptual framework: The study is guided by the Research Framework for Post-Migration Health and Behavior Change, and the Resiliency Model of Family Stress. Subjects: This analysis includes baseline data for 220 women who were recruited through community advertisements and network sampling. Inclusion criteria were age 40-70, married with at least one child in the U.S., and immigration within the past 8 years. Mean age was 56.12 years (SD=8.32), and mean length of residence was 3.38 years (SD=2.29). Only 5% of the women had more than two children. Method: Women were interviewed at a central community location. Questionnaires were self-administered in Russian, supervised by bilingual research assistants. Measures included Family Pressures Scale-Ethnic (FPS), Feetham Family Functioning Survey (FFFS), Family Hardiness Index (FHI), Family Problem Solving Communication (FPSC), and Center for Epidemiological Studies—Depression (CES-D) Scale. Results: Mean CES-D score was 23.91 (SD=9.64), with a range of 3-50. Close to 80% obtained a score greater than 16, the recommended screening cutoff. With the exception of FPS, family scores were significantly correlated with each other. All scales were negatively correlated with the CES-D. Age was positively correlated with the CES-D score, and negatively correlated with FHI. Length of residence was not correlated with any of the instruments. Number of children was not related to any of the variables. When CES-D was regressed on family scores, age and length of residence, FFFS, FHI, and age were independent contributors, and the model accounted for nearly 41% of the variation in depression score. Conclusions: Findings indicate that interventions focused on family relationships are needed to address the high level of depressed mood in this population. AN: MN030268
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePost-Immigration Family Relationships and Depression in Midlife Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161471-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Post-Immigration Family Relationships and Depression in Midlife Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Miller, Arlene</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 845 South Damen, Room 1016, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Peggy Chandler; Olga Sorokin; Suzanne Feetham </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This study examines family adaptation, demographic characteristics, and depression in women who immigrated from the former Soviet Union (FSU). Data are from a larger longitudinal study of acculturation, family adaptation, and post-immigration health and well-being. Conceptual framework: The study is guided by the Research Framework for Post-Migration Health and Behavior Change, and the Resiliency Model of Family Stress. Subjects: This analysis includes baseline data for 220 women who were recruited through community advertisements and network sampling. Inclusion criteria were age 40-70, married with at least one child in the U.S., and immigration within the past 8 years. Mean age was 56.12 years (SD=8.32), and mean length of residence was 3.38 years (SD=2.29). Only 5% of the women had more than two children. Method: Women were interviewed at a central community location. Questionnaires were self-administered in Russian, supervised by bilingual research assistants. Measures included Family Pressures Scale-Ethnic (FPS), Feetham Family Functioning Survey (FFFS), Family Hardiness Index (FHI), Family Problem Solving Communication (FPSC), and Center for Epidemiological Studies&mdash;Depression (CES-D) Scale. Results: Mean CES-D score was 23.91 (SD=9.64), with a range of 3-50. Close to 80% obtained a score greater than 16, the recommended screening cutoff. With the exception of FPS, family scores were significantly correlated with each other. All scales were negatively correlated with the CES-D. Age was positively correlated with the CES-D score, and negatively correlated with FHI. Length of residence was not correlated with any of the instruments. Number of children was not related to any of the variables. When CES-D was regressed on family scores, age and length of residence, FFFS, FHI, and age were independent contributors, and the model accounted for nearly 41% of the variation in depression score. Conclusions: Findings indicate that interventions focused on family relationships are needed to address the high level of depressed mood in this population. AN: MN030268</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:21:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:21:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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