2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161478
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Viewpoint on Women’s Health from an Academic Nursing Center
Abstract:
A Viewpoint on Women’s Health from an Academic Nursing Center
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Neff, Donna
Contact Address:CON, 37 Jefferson Drive, Hudson, OH, 44236, USA
Co-Authors:Elizabeth Kinion
Academic nursing centers (ANCs) provide vulnerable women an entrée into health care. Current research notes that accessibility, provider-patient relationship, and comprehensiveness of primary care are important for low-income women. The purpose of this retrospective descriptive study was to describe the characteristics and health problems of 1787 vulnerable women who sought primary health care at an ANC. The conceptual framework for the study was an adaptation of Anderson’s revised Behavioral Model of Health Services Use. This model was initially developed as a framework for understanding the population’s use of and access to health care services. Research Questions: For women who seek primary health care at an ANC: 1) What are their characteristics? 2) What are their primary health problems?, and; 3) What are the primary nursing interventions? Data were abstracted from client charts and entered into a computerized clinical data set for the Omaha classification system. Findings revealed that the women’s ages ranged from 18 to 99 years (c=41.8, SD=17years), and the majority were unemployed (n=882; 49%) and unmarried (n=1425; 80%). The mean level of education was 10th grade (SD=4 grades). Diverse racial/ethnic groups included: African American (n=860; 48%), Caucasian (n=633; 35%) and American Indian (n=136; 8%). The most prevalent health problems were in the physiological (n=28,867; 44%) and health related behaviors (n=27,219; 42%) domains. Nurses documented 65,013 nursing interventions representing the four Intervention Scheme Categories: the most common being health teaching, guidance and counseling (n=20,960; 32%) and surveillance (n=21,801; 34%). Nurses individualized interventions and the most frequent were screening and education. At follow-up visits, the outcomes of knowledge, behavior and status were significantly better for all women; they improved the most for those 50 years and older. Conclusion: Academic nursing centers represent innovative “nontraditional” models of primary health care that seek to improve access for vulnerable women. AN: MN030071
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Viewpoint on Women’s Health from an Academic Nursing Centeren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161478-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Viewpoint on Women&rsquo;s Health from an Academic Nursing Center</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Neff, Donna</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 37 Jefferson Drive, Hudson, OH, 44236, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Elizabeth Kinion</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Academic nursing centers (ANCs) provide vulnerable women an entr&eacute;e into health care. Current research notes that accessibility, provider-patient relationship, and comprehensiveness of primary care are important for low-income women. The purpose of this retrospective descriptive study was to describe the characteristics and health problems of 1787 vulnerable women who sought primary health care at an ANC. The conceptual framework for the study was an adaptation of Anderson&rsquo;s revised Behavioral Model of Health Services Use. This model was initially developed as a framework for understanding the population&rsquo;s use of and access to health care services. Research Questions: For women who seek primary health care at an ANC: 1) What are their characteristics? 2) What are their primary health problems?, and; 3) What are the primary nursing interventions? Data were abstracted from client charts and entered into a computerized clinical data set for the Omaha classification system. Findings revealed that the women&rsquo;s ages ranged from 18 to 99 years (c=41.8, SD=17years), and the majority were unemployed (n=882; 49%) and unmarried (n=1425; 80%). The mean level of education was 10th grade (SD=4 grades). Diverse racial/ethnic groups included: African American (n=860; 48%), Caucasian (n=633; 35%) and American Indian (n=136; 8%). The most prevalent health problems were in the physiological (n=28,867; 44%) and health related behaviors (n=27,219; 42%) domains. Nurses documented 65,013 nursing interventions representing the four Intervention Scheme Categories: the most common being health teaching, guidance and counseling (n=20,960; 32%) and surveillance (n=21,801; 34%). Nurses individualized interventions and the most frequent were screening and education. At follow-up visits, the outcomes of knowledge, behavior and status were significantly better for all women; they improved the most for those 50 years and older. Conclusion: Academic nursing centers represent innovative &ldquo;nontraditional&rdquo; models of primary health care that seek to improve access for vulnerable women. AN: MN030071 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:22:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:22:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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