Effects of a Walking Intervention for African American and European American Women in an Urban Setting

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161479
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of a Walking Intervention for African American and European American Women in an Urban Setting
Abstract:
Effects of a Walking Intervention for African American and European American Women in an Urban Setting
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Nies, Mary
Contact Address:SON, Cohn Building, Suite 319, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA
Co-Authors:Heather L. Chruscial
Increasing the physical activity of women, particularly minority women, is critical for health promotion. Furthermore, identifying the mediating variables that are important to a successful intervention is also essential. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a counseling intervention administered by telephone that was designed to help African American and European American women begin and maintain a walking program. The intervention focused on the benefits of physical activity, increasing self-efficacy, goal setting, restructuring plans, dealing with relapse prevention, and increasing social support. Participants (N=249) were between the ages of 30 and 60 and included 53% percent African American and 47% European American women. Women were assigned to one of three groups: Intervention - telephone calls with counseling; Attention Control - telephone calls with no counseling; and No-attention Control - no telephone calls. Women were measured on a 1-mile walk test, blood pressure, lung capacity, BMI, percent body fat, 7-day physical activity recall, and mood. Measures were taken at baseline, six months, and 1-year. Doubly multivariate ANOVA was employed to examine time, time by intervention group, and time by race effects. Over time, there was significant improvement in the 1-mile walk test, blood pressure, lung capacity, percent body fat, self-reported activity, and overall mood (F(14, 209)=14.0, p< .01). There was no difference between change for African American versus European American women. Change in restructuring plans, relapse prevention, and self-efficacy were most significantly related to change on outcome variables. Results suggest the importance of examining the mediating effects of the intervention on behavioral and health outcomes. This study allowed for the evaluation of important components and limitations of a walking intervention. AN: MN030141
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffects of a Walking Intervention for African American and European American Women in an Urban Settingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161479-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effects of a Walking Intervention for African American and European American Women in an Urban Setting </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Nies, Mary</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, Cohn Building, Suite 319, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Heather L. Chruscial</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Increasing the physical activity of women, particularly minority women, is critical for health promotion. Furthermore, identifying the mediating variables that are important to a successful intervention is also essential. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a counseling intervention administered by telephone that was designed to help African American and European American women begin and maintain a walking program. The intervention focused on the benefits of physical activity, increasing self-efficacy, goal setting, restructuring plans, dealing with relapse prevention, and increasing social support. Participants (N=249) were between the ages of 30 and 60 and included 53% percent African American and 47% European American women. Women were assigned to one of three groups: Intervention - telephone calls with counseling; Attention Control - telephone calls with no counseling; and No-attention Control - no telephone calls. Women were measured on a 1-mile walk test, blood pressure, lung capacity, BMI, percent body fat, 7-day physical activity recall, and mood. Measures were taken at baseline, six months, and 1-year. Doubly multivariate ANOVA was employed to examine time, time by intervention group, and time by race effects. Over time, there was significant improvement in the 1-mile walk test, blood pressure, lung capacity, percent body fat, self-reported activity, and overall mood (F(14, 209)=14.0, p&lt; .01). There was no difference between change for African American versus European American women. Change in restructuring plans, relapse prevention, and self-efficacy were most significantly related to change on outcome variables. Results suggest the importance of examining the mediating effects of the intervention on behavioral and health outcomes. This study allowed for the evaluation of important components and limitations of a walking intervention. AN: MN030141 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:22:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:22:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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