2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161480
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Challenges of Accrual and Data Collection in Family-based Research
Abstract:
Challenges of Accrual and Data Collection in Family-based Research
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Northouse, Laurel
Contact Address:SON, 400 N. Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA
Co-Authors:Tansey Rosset; Marilyn Jeffs; Adele McSwain; Evelyn Sims; Ann Schafenacker; Elizabeth Galvin; Darlene Mood; Cordelia Tucker
There is a growing interest in conducting family-based research in order to determine the effects of cancer on the family unit. However, there are certain challenges in conducting family research. The purpose of this study was to identify the challenges of accrual and data collection in family-based research. This study also discusses gender issues that emerge in accrual and data collection, depending on the gender of the patient (male vs. female) and gender of the family caregiver. The challenges identified were content analyzed from multiple tape-recorded discussions of experienced data collectors who participated in two family-based randomized clinical trials. Family stress theory guided these studies. One clinical trial tested the effect of a family intervention with women with recurrent breast cancer and their family caregiver (144 dyads). The second clinical trial tested the effect of a tailored version of the family intervention with men with prostate cancer and their partners (62 dyads to date, still in progress). Content analysis of the taped-recorded sessions revealed several challenges that were common when conducting family-based research. In regard to accrual, researchers encountered difficulty with: privacy managers, voice mail and answering machines; repeated calls to obtain the agreement of both patient and family member; one member agreeing and the other refusing; and finding a common time for data collection that fit participants' and data collectors' schedules. In regard to data collection, difficulties arose when one or both members of the dyad missed follow-up appointments, had difficulty reading or understanding the questionnaires, or when there were household distractions that interfered with the data collection sessions. More problems were encountered accruing and collecting data with the prostate cancer sample than with the breast cancer sample. Gender-based issues and reasons for these difficulties will be discussed. AN: MN030102
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleChallenges of Accrual and Data Collection in Family-based Researchen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161480-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Challenges of Accrual and Data Collection in Family-based Research</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Northouse, Laurel</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 400 N. Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Tansey Rosset; Marilyn Jeffs; Adele McSwain; Evelyn Sims; Ann Schafenacker; Elizabeth Galvin; Darlene Mood; Cordelia Tucker</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">There is a growing interest in conducting family-based research in order to determine the effects of cancer on the family unit. However, there are certain challenges in conducting family research. The purpose of this study was to identify the challenges of accrual and data collection in family-based research. This study also discusses gender issues that emerge in accrual and data collection, depending on the gender of the patient (male vs. female) and gender of the family caregiver. The challenges identified were content analyzed from multiple tape-recorded discussions of experienced data collectors who participated in two family-based randomized clinical trials. Family stress theory guided these studies. One clinical trial tested the effect of a family intervention with women with recurrent breast cancer and their family caregiver (144 dyads). The second clinical trial tested the effect of a tailored version of the family intervention with men with prostate cancer and their partners (62 dyads to date, still in progress). Content analysis of the taped-recorded sessions revealed several challenges that were common when conducting family-based research. In regard to accrual, researchers encountered difficulty with: privacy managers, voice mail and answering machines; repeated calls to obtain the agreement of both patient and family member; one member agreeing and the other refusing; and finding a common time for data collection that fit participants' and data collectors' schedules. In regard to data collection, difficulties arose when one or both members of the dyad missed follow-up appointments, had difficulty reading or understanding the questionnaires, or when there were household distractions that interfered with the data collection sessions. More problems were encountered accruing and collecting data with the prostate cancer sample than with the breast cancer sample. Gender-based issues and reasons for these difficulties will be discussed. AN: MN030102 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:22:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:22:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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