American Society of Pain Management Nurses Practice Analysis: Role Delineation Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161486
Type:
Presentation
Title:
American Society of Pain Management Nurses Practice Analysis: Role Delineation Study
Abstract:
American Society of Pain Management Nurses Practice Analysis: Role Delineation Study
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Pellino, Teresa
Contact Address:600 Highland Ave, H4/885, Madison, WI, 53792, USA
Co-Authors:Joyce S. Willens; Rosemary C. Polomano; Mary L. Heye
A role delineation study was carried out by the American Society of Pain Management Nurses (ASPMN) to determine the activities performed by nurses involved in pain management. Demographic characteristics of pain management nurses and differences in practice based on educational preparation and specialty affiliation were identified. The role delineation survey was developed based on Nursing Intervention Classifications. The survey consisted of 92 activity statements. Respondents rated frequency of performing each activity and importance of the activity. A Mean Activity Index score was calculated for each item. All members of ASPMN, the nursing special interest group (SIG) of the American Pain Society (APS), the pain SIG of the Oncology Nursing Society (ONS), and random samples of members of the National Association of Orthopaedic Nurses (NAON), Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association (HPNA), American Association of Nurse Anesthetists (AANA), American Association of Critical Care Nurses (AACN), American Academy of Nurse Practitioners (AANP) were surveyed. Seven hundred and sixty-one questionnaires were analyzed (24.8% response rate). Demographic characteristics of the sample mirrored those of nursing as a whole in the United States. The activities with the highest Mean Activity Index were primarily those involving assessment of pain. Nurses with diploma and AD preparation rated assessment and nonpharmacologic management higher and communication and collaboration lower than nurses with higher educational preparation. Activities varied somewhat as a reflection of respondents’ nursing specialty. The results of the study will be used to refine standards of care, develop nursing education curricula, develop research priorities, and develop a blueprint for a certification examination. AN: MN030079
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAmerican Society of Pain Management Nurses Practice Analysis: Role Delineation Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161486-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">American Society of Pain Management Nurses Practice Analysis: Role Delineation Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Pellino, Teresa</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">600 Highland Ave, H4/885, Madison, WI, 53792, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Joyce S. Willens; Rosemary C. Polomano; Mary L. Heye </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">A role delineation study was carried out by the American Society of Pain Management Nurses (ASPMN) to determine the activities performed by nurses involved in pain management. Demographic characteristics of pain management nurses and differences in practice based on educational preparation and specialty affiliation were identified. The role delineation survey was developed based on Nursing Intervention Classifications. The survey consisted of 92 activity statements. Respondents rated frequency of performing each activity and importance of the activity. A Mean Activity Index score was calculated for each item. All members of ASPMN, the nursing special interest group (SIG) of the American Pain Society (APS), the pain SIG of the Oncology Nursing Society (ONS), and random samples of members of the National Association of Orthopaedic Nurses (NAON), Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association (HPNA), American Association of Nurse Anesthetists (AANA), American Association of Critical Care Nurses (AACN), American Academy of Nurse Practitioners (AANP) were surveyed. Seven hundred and sixty-one questionnaires were analyzed (24.8% response rate). Demographic characteristics of the sample mirrored those of nursing as a whole in the United States. The activities with the highest Mean Activity Index were primarily those involving assessment of pain. Nurses with diploma and AD preparation rated assessment and nonpharmacologic management higher and communication and collaboration lower than nurses with higher educational preparation. Activities varied somewhat as a reflection of respondents&rsquo; nursing specialty. The results of the study will be used to refine standards of care, develop nursing education curricula, develop research priorities, and develop a blueprint for a certification examination. AN: MN030079 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:22:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:22:08Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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