2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161487
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Women's Dreams and Aspirations Amidst the Everyday Challenges of HIV/AIDS
Abstract:
Women's Dreams and Aspirations Amidst the Everyday Challenges of HIV/AIDS
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Plach, Sandra
Contact Address:SON, Cunningham Hall, PO Box 413, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA
Co-Authors:Patricia E. Stevens
The purpose of this presentation is to share findings about the dreams and aspirations of women living with HIV/AIDS. Data come from a longitudinal qualitative study of HIV-infected women residing in Wisconsin. Over a period of two years, we have conducted up to 10 semi-structured narrative interviews with each participant to gain an in-depth understanding of her everyday life and the meaning and impact of HIV/AIDS for her and her family. The sample consists of 55 women, 53% of whom are African American, 36% Caucasian, 7% Hispanic and 4% Native American. They range in age from 22 to 54 (M=41), with a mean income of $11,337 (SD $6,507). Most contracted HIV through heterosexual sexual contact (71%), 11% through injection drug use, 11% through a combination of both, and 7% through other reported sources such as blood transfusion or tattoo. The majority (75%) resides within one major metropolitan area while the remainder comes from more rural areas of the state. Transcripts from this large qualitative database have been aggregated and managed using N-VIVO software. A multi-staged narrative analysis has been the primary analytic approach in the study. Our findings illuminate the importance of accomplishments and regrets, what women had desired to become, the ideal persons they always wanted to be, and their hopes for themselves and their children. Participant’s stories indicated how they reflect on their pasts and anticipate time ahead in the context of HIV/AIDS, how they have dealt with disappointments and sorrows, and how they accommodate potentially foreshortened futures. Overall, their dreams and aspirations seemed to be a wellspring of strength and courage for women as they faced myriad physical, social, and emotional difficulties. Recommendations for practice will be offered to help women with HIV/AIDS draw upon the resourcefulness of their dreams and aspirations to contend with challenges. AN: MN030386
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWomen's Dreams and Aspirations Amidst the Everyday Challenges of HIV/AIDSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161487-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Women's Dreams and Aspirations Amidst the Everyday Challenges of HIV/AIDS</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Plach, Sandra</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, Cunningham Hall, PO Box 413, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Patricia E. Stevens </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this presentation is to share findings about the dreams and aspirations of women living with HIV/AIDS. Data come from a longitudinal qualitative study of HIV-infected women residing in Wisconsin. Over a period of two years, we have conducted up to 10 semi-structured narrative interviews with each participant to gain an in-depth understanding of her everyday life and the meaning and impact of HIV/AIDS for her and her family. The sample consists of 55 women, 53% of whom are African American, 36% Caucasian, 7% Hispanic and 4% Native American. They range in age from 22 to 54 (M=41), with a mean income of $11,337 (SD $6,507). Most contracted HIV through heterosexual sexual contact (71%), 11% through injection drug use, 11% through a combination of both, and 7% through other reported sources such as blood transfusion or tattoo. The majority (75%) resides within one major metropolitan area while the remainder comes from more rural areas of the state. Transcripts from this large qualitative database have been aggregated and managed using N-VIVO software. A multi-staged narrative analysis has been the primary analytic approach in the study. Our findings illuminate the importance of accomplishments and regrets, what women had desired to become, the ideal persons they always wanted to be, and their hopes for themselves and their children. Participant&rsquo;s stories indicated how they reflect on their pasts and anticipate time ahead in the context of HIV/AIDS, how they have dealt with disappointments and sorrows, and how they accommodate potentially foreshortened futures. Overall, their dreams and aspirations seemed to be a wellspring of strength and courage for women as they faced myriad physical, social, and emotional difficulties. Recommendations for practice will be offered to help women with HIV/AIDS draw upon the resourcefulness of their dreams and aspirations to contend with challenges. AN: MN030386 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:22:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:22:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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