2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161489
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Fathering a premature daughter: In his own words
Abstract:
Fathering a premature daughter: In his own words
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Pohlman, Shawn
Contact Address:SON, 843 Heron Woods Dr, Manchester, MP, 63021, USA
Our understanding of the experience of fathering after the birth of a premature infant is very limited because researchers have primarily focused on mothers. Likewise, at the bedside, fathers are sometimes overlooked as health care professionals attend to the more immediate needs of the infant and mother. Fathers may assume a more passive role as they quietly, but keenly, observe the matrix of this foreign territory. The purpose of this paper is to enhance our understanding of fathers, making their experiences more visible to health care providers. Findings will be presented in the form of an in-depth case study, exploring one father’s struggle to parent his tiny, premature daughter. This case study is part of a larger qualitative study of eight fathers. The philosophical framework for this study is based in interpretive phenomenology, which assumes that humans dwell in a meaningful world. Data for the case study were generated from eight interviews, beginning two weeks after his daughter’s birth and ending approximately four months after her discharge home. Each interview was tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim. The narrative data were analyzed in the interpretive tradition, which involved a systematic, circular process that evolved as my conditional understanding of his actions and life deepened from numerous readings and narrative interpretations. Findings will be presented within three broad themes: (1) the endless struggle between the demands of his work and fathering, which often left him exhausted and guilt-ridden; (2) the trials and tribulations of nurturing a relationship with a very premature infant; and (3) fathering from a distance. The struggles this father encountered were virtually invisible to health care providers because they were often situated “outside” the NICU realm. This father’s story can help to “open our eyes” to the world of other fathers after the birth of a premature infant. AN: MN030174
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFathering a premature daughter: In his own wordsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161489-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Fathering a premature daughter: In his own words</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Pohlman, Shawn</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 843 Heron Woods Dr, Manchester, MP, 63021, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Our understanding of the experience of fathering after the birth of a premature infant is very limited because researchers have primarily focused on mothers. Likewise, at the bedside, fathers are sometimes overlooked as health care professionals attend to the more immediate needs of the infant and mother. Fathers may assume a more passive role as they quietly, but keenly, observe the matrix of this foreign territory. The purpose of this paper is to enhance our understanding of fathers, making their experiences more visible to health care providers. Findings will be presented in the form of an in-depth case study, exploring one father&rsquo;s struggle to parent his tiny, premature daughter. This case study is part of a larger qualitative study of eight fathers. The philosophical framework for this study is based in interpretive phenomenology, which assumes that humans dwell in a meaningful world. Data for the case study were generated from eight interviews, beginning two weeks after his daughter&rsquo;s birth and ending approximately four months after her discharge home. Each interview was tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim. The narrative data were analyzed in the interpretive tradition, which involved a systematic, circular process that evolved as my conditional understanding of his actions and life deepened from numerous readings and narrative interpretations. Findings will be presented within three broad themes: (1) the endless struggle between the demands of his work and fathering, which often left him exhausted and guilt-ridden; (2) the trials and tribulations of nurturing a relationship with a very premature infant; and (3) fathering from a distance. The struggles this father encountered were virtually invisible to health care providers because they were often situated &ldquo;outside&rdquo; the NICU realm. This father&rsquo;s story can help to &ldquo;open our eyes&rdquo; to the world of other fathers after the birth of a premature infant. AN: MN030174 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:22:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:22:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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