2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161490
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Barriers to Lead Screening: Perspectives from Ohio Medicaid Providers
Abstract:
Barriers to Lead Screening: Perspectives from Ohio Medicaid Providers
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Polivka, Barbara
Contact Address:CON, 1585 Neil Avenue , Columbus, OH, 43210, USA
Co-Authors:Dayle Darr
Screening for lead poisoning in children receiving Medicaid is federally mandated at ages 12 and 24 months, yet only about one-third of Ohio’s eligible children are screened. The purpose of this study was to determine barriers to blood lead screening from the perspectives of a random sample of Ohio Medicaid providers. A self-administered questionnaire was designed to assess lead risk-assessment practices, blood lead screening practices, and barriers to lead screening. Respondents (n=289) were primarily physicians (77%) with pediatric (45%) or family practice (42%) specialties. Nearly one-half (48%) reported serving families from high-risk areas of lead exposure, while 13% were unsure as to their patients’ risk status. Forty-four percent stated they “always” administer a blood lead test on 12 month olds, whereas only 28% “always” screen 24 month olds. The primary barriers to lead screening from the provider’s perspective were: parents refusing to have their child tested (65%); parents not complying with a blood lead screening order (66%); and inability to provide on-site blood lead testing (57%). Interestingly, 82% also reported being prompted by parents to obtain a blood lead test. Providers reported they received the majority of their information on lead poisoning from local (89%) and state (74%) health departments, yet 79% were unaware of PLANET (Pediatric Lead Awareness NETwork), Ohio Department of Health’s statewide lead education resource for health care professionals. This study suggests barriers to the blood lead screening process are multifactorial and multidisciplinary. Efforts by community health nurses should be aimed at dissolving disparities within the system. AN: MN030092
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBarriers to Lead Screening: Perspectives from Ohio Medicaid Providersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161490-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Barriers to Lead Screening: Perspectives from Ohio Medicaid Providers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Polivka, Barbara</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 1585 Neil Avenue , Columbus, OH, 43210, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Dayle Darr</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Screening for lead poisoning in children receiving Medicaid is federally mandated at ages 12 and 24 months, yet only about one-third of Ohio&rsquo;s eligible children are screened. The purpose of this study was to determine barriers to blood lead screening from the perspectives of a random sample of Ohio Medicaid providers. A self-administered questionnaire was designed to assess lead risk-assessment practices, blood lead screening practices, and barriers to lead screening. Respondents (n=289) were primarily physicians (77%) with pediatric (45%) or family practice (42%) specialties. Nearly one-half (48%) reported serving families from high-risk areas of lead exposure, while 13% were unsure as to their patients&rsquo; risk status. Forty-four percent stated they &ldquo;always&rdquo; administer a blood lead test on 12 month olds, whereas only 28% &ldquo;always&rdquo; screen 24 month olds. The primary barriers to lead screening from the provider&rsquo;s perspective were: parents refusing to have their child tested (65%); parents not complying with a blood lead screening order (66%); and inability to provide on-site blood lead testing (57%). Interestingly, 82% also reported being prompted by parents to obtain a blood lead test. Providers reported they received the majority of their information on lead poisoning from local (89%) and state (74%) health departments, yet 79% were unaware of PLANET (Pediatric Lead Awareness NETwork), Ohio Department of Health&rsquo;s statewide lead education resource for health care professionals. This study suggests barriers to the blood lead screening process are multifactorial and multidisciplinary. Efforts by community health nurses should be aimed at dissolving disparities within the system. AN: MN030092 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:22:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:22:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.