2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161493
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Teens’ Responses to Assessment of Perinatal Violence
Abstract:
Teens’ Responses to Assessment of Perinatal Violence
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Renker, Paula
P.I. Institution Name:University of Akron
Contact Address:CON, 201-X Mary Gladwin Hall, Akron, OH, 44325, USA
The purpose of this study was to identify strengths and weaknesses of current approaches to perinatal teen violence assessment to enhance the development of more effective strategies for assessment and advocacy. Conceptual/Framework: The organizing framework focuses on the relationships among violence experiences of teens, providers’ violence assessment strategies and teens’ responses. Participants: Twenty non-pregnant teens between the ages of 18-20 years who had experienced perinatal violence in a pregnancy within the last 3 years were included in this study. Teens were invited to participate regardless of the pregnancy outcome (abortion, miscarriage, or birth). Method: A semi-structured interview guide was used to inquire about teens’ violence experiences (severity, type, and perpetrator), health care providers’ violence assessment strategies, and teens’ responses. Teens provided their rationale for acknowledging or denying violence when asked. The questions relating to violence assessment were descriptively analyzed by recording the frequency of responses to preidentified categories. The Categorical-Content Approach as described by Lieblech, Tuval-Mashiach, & Zilber (1998) was used to classify the responses to the open-ended questions and to describe categories and emerging themes. Results: Ten of the 20 teens were assessed for perinatal violence, with only 4 acknowledging their abuse. Four categories of responses emerged from the analysis of teens’ answers to the question “Did you want help?” representing the themes of Power/Powerlessness; Fear/Hope; Trust/Mistrust; and Action/Inertia. Conclusions: Implications for violence assessment and advocacy include asking about past and present physical, sexual, and emotional abuse, using multiple approaches for different members of the health care team, explaining about reporting issues, providing privacy, and use of community resources. AN: MN030341
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTeens’ Responses to Assessment of Perinatal Violenceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161493-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Teens&rsquo; Responses to Assessment of Perinatal Violence</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Renker, Paula</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Akron</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 201-X Mary Gladwin Hall, Akron, OH, 44325, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to identify strengths and weaknesses of current approaches to perinatal teen violence assessment to enhance the development of more effective strategies for assessment and advocacy. Conceptual/Framework: The organizing framework focuses on the relationships among violence experiences of teens, providers&rsquo; violence assessment strategies and teens&rsquo; responses. Participants: Twenty non-pregnant teens between the ages of 18-20 years who had experienced perinatal violence in a pregnancy within the last 3 years were included in this study. Teens were invited to participate regardless of the pregnancy outcome (abortion, miscarriage, or birth). Method: A semi-structured interview guide was used to inquire about teens&rsquo; violence experiences (severity, type, and perpetrator), health care providers&rsquo; violence assessment strategies, and teens&rsquo; responses. Teens provided their rationale for acknowledging or denying violence when asked. The questions relating to violence assessment were descriptively analyzed by recording the frequency of responses to preidentified categories. The Categorical-Content Approach as described by Lieblech, Tuval-Mashiach, &amp; Zilber (1998) was used to classify the responses to the open-ended questions and to describe categories and emerging themes. Results: Ten of the 20 teens were assessed for perinatal violence, with only 4 acknowledging their abuse. Four categories of responses emerged from the analysis of teens&rsquo; answers to the question &ldquo;Did you want help?&rdquo; representing the themes of Power/Powerlessness; Fear/Hope; Trust/Mistrust; and Action/Inertia. Conclusions: Implications for violence assessment and advocacy include asking about past and present physical, sexual, and emotional abuse, using multiple approaches for different members of the health care team, explaining about reporting issues, providing privacy, and use of community resources. AN: MN030341 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:22:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:22:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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