Variance in Psychosocial Adjustment Explained by Cancer Related Fatigue and Hope in Women with Breast Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161494
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Variance in Psychosocial Adjustment Explained by Cancer Related Fatigue and Hope in Women with Breast Cancer
Abstract:
Variance in Psychosocial Adjustment Explained by Cancer Related Fatigue and Hope in Women with Breast Cancer
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Reuille, Kristina
Contact Address:4965-7 Potomac Square Way, Indianapolis, IN, 46268, USA
Cancer-related fatigue, a common and distressing symptom for patients with cancer, is associated with poor psychosocial adjustment, and emotional distress. Hope may facilitate adjustment to cancer and treatment-related symptoms such as fatigue. However, there is limited research on hope and CRF. The purpose of this analysis is to describe how CRF and hope explain variance in psychosocial adjustment (PA) for patients with breast cancer. It is proposed that CRF and hope scores will be related to PA. Participants were Caucasian women (N=73) who received surgery for breast cancer (67.6% lumpectomy, 32.4% mastectomy). Many received adjuvant therapy (radiation, chemotherapy, and/or Tamoxifen). Most women were over age 50 (60%), and married (73%). Data collection via mailed survey occurred three months after surgery. Instrumentation included the Profile of Mood States fatigue subscale (F_POMS), the Herth Hope Index (HHI), and the Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Scale (PAIS-SR). CRF and hope were entered simultaneously in a linear regression model of variance in PA. CRF contributes significantly to variance in PA (t=7.075; p<.001). However, hope does not contribute significantly to variance in PA (t=-1.772; p=.081). The overall model is significant (Adj.R2=.527; F(2,70)=41.44; p<.001). Women with higher CRF reported poorer PA, and CRF explained over 50% of variance in PA. However, hope does not contribute significantly to variance in PA when controlling for CRF. Further research is necessary to understand the contribution of CRF to PA. A study is planned to elucidate the mechanisms of CRF and distress with the goal of facilitating PA in patients with cancer. AN: MN030051
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleVariance in Psychosocial Adjustment Explained by Cancer Related Fatigue and Hope in Women with Breast Canceren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161494-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Variance in Psychosocial Adjustment Explained by Cancer Related Fatigue and Hope in Women with Breast Cancer </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Reuille, Kristina</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">4965-7 Potomac Square Way, Indianapolis, IN, 46268, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Cancer-related fatigue, a common and distressing symptom for patients with cancer, is associated with poor psychosocial adjustment, and emotional distress. Hope may facilitate adjustment to cancer and treatment-related symptoms such as fatigue. However, there is limited research on hope and CRF. The purpose of this analysis is to describe how CRF and hope explain variance in psychosocial adjustment (PA) for patients with breast cancer. It is proposed that CRF and hope scores will be related to PA. Participants were Caucasian women (N=73) who received surgery for breast cancer (67.6% lumpectomy, 32.4% mastectomy). Many received adjuvant therapy (radiation, chemotherapy, and/or Tamoxifen). Most women were over age 50 (60%), and married (73%). Data collection via mailed survey occurred three months after surgery. Instrumentation included the Profile of Mood States fatigue subscale (F_POMS), the Herth Hope Index (HHI), and the Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Scale (PAIS-SR). CRF and hope were entered simultaneously in a linear regression model of variance in PA. CRF contributes significantly to variance in PA (t=7.075; p&lt;.001). However, hope does not contribute significantly to variance in PA (t=-1.772; p=.081). The overall model is significant (Adj.R2=.527; F(2,70)=41.44; p&lt;.001). Women with higher CRF reported poorer PA, and CRF explained over 50% of variance in PA. However, hope does not contribute significantly to variance in PA when controlling for CRF. Further research is necessary to understand the contribution of CRF to PA. A study is planned to elucidate the mechanisms of CRF and distress with the goal of facilitating PA in patients with cancer. AN: MN030051</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:22:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:22:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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