2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161495
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Seeing Beyond: Scientific Vision in Interdisciplinary Research
Abstract:
Seeing Beyond: Scientific Vision in Interdisciplinary Research
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Riesch, Susan
Contact Address:SON, K6/228 Clinical Sciences Building, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI, 53792-2455, USA
The capacity for creativity and scientific vision is essential if an individual is to be successful in interdisciplinary research. Although most nurse scientists working today were encouraged during their own research training to develop programs of research that drew from and linked to other fields, to date, relatively few have worked in teams that were literally developing new fields, such as prevention science, sustainable development or psychoneuroimmunology. What are the rewards and challenges of working at the margins of knowledge? How do nurse scientists maintain their own disciplinary grounding while remaining agile enough to see beyond conventional world views? The challenges that face working scientists in this vein are mirrored at the institutional level. Many research-intensive universities are now moving to innovative faculty recruitment and hiring practices, aimed at blurring disciplinary boundaries and nurturing knowledge generation at the margins. Even patterns of research funding are shifting in parallel with this trend, and the very structures of research environments will be affected. How well nurse scientists fare individually and collectively as the very landmarks of the scientific landscape are altered will depend on their ability to lead in rapidly changing research environments and their tolerance for the discomfort and ambiguity inherent in working at the margins of knowledge. AN: MN030322
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSeeing Beyond: Scientific Vision in Interdisciplinary Researchen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161495-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Seeing Beyond: Scientific Vision in Interdisciplinary Research </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Riesch, Susan</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, K6/228 Clinical Sciences Building, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI, 53792-2455, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The capacity for creativity and scientific vision is essential if an individual is to be successful in interdisciplinary research. Although most nurse scientists working today were encouraged during their own research training to develop programs of research that drew from and linked to other fields, to date, relatively few have worked in teams that were literally developing new fields, such as prevention science, sustainable development or psychoneuroimmunology. What are the rewards and challenges of working at the margins of knowledge? How do nurse scientists maintain their own disciplinary grounding while remaining agile enough to see beyond conventional world views? The challenges that face working scientists in this vein are mirrored at the institutional level. Many research-intensive universities are now moving to innovative faculty recruitment and hiring practices, aimed at blurring disciplinary boundaries and nurturing knowledge generation at the margins. Even patterns of research funding are shifting in parallel with this trend, and the very structures of research environments will be affected. How well nurse scientists fare individually and collectively as the very landmarks of the scientific landscape are altered will depend on their ability to lead in rapidly changing research environments and their tolerance for the discomfort and ambiguity inherent in working at the margins of knowledge. AN: MN030322</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:22:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:22:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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