Osteoporosis Knowledge, Health Beliefs, and Osteoporosis Preventing Behaviors in Women 6 Month Post DXA

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161505
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Osteoporosis Knowledge, Health Beliefs, and Osteoporosis Preventing Behaviors in Women 6 Month Post DXA
Abstract:
Osteoporosis Knowledge, Health Beliefs, and Osteoporosis Preventing Behaviors in Women 6 Month Post DXA
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Sedlak, Carol
Contact Address:CON, Henderson Hall, Kent, OH, 44242, USA
Co-Authors:Margaret Doheny; Patricia Estok; Richard Zeller
Approximately 28 million people in the United States suffer from osteoporosis or low bone density. The financial and social costs of osteoporosis are high. The purpose of this study was to compare knowledge of osteoporosis, health beliefs, and osteoporosis prevention behaviors (OPB) in women ages 50 to 65 at six months post dual energy absorptiometry (DXA). The Revised Health Belief Model (HBM) provided the theoretical framework. Research questions were: 1) Is there a difference in knowledge of osteoporosis and/or health beliefs in women who had a DXA scan and those who did not? 2) Is there a difference in OPB reported by women who had a DXA scan and those who did not? 3) Is the DXA T-score correlated with knowledge of osteoporosis, health beliefs and/or OPB? In this longitudinal study, 197 women were randomized into two groups. The experimental group (n=97) received a DXA scan at the beginning of the study and the control group (n=100) did not. All completed a questionnaire comprised of the Osteoporosis Knowledge Test (OKT), Osteoporosis Health Belief Scale (OHBS), Osteoporosis Self Efficacy Scale (OSES) (Kim, Horan, & Gendler, 1991), and the Osteoporosis Prevention Behaviors Survey (OPBS) (Doheny & Sedlak, 1995). Outcomes revealed significant differences in the HBM variables of perceived benefits of exercise (t=2.38, p=.018) and perceived barriers to calcium intake (t=-2.49, p=.014). OPB differences were in calcium intake (t=3.679, p<.0001). Knowing DXA results increased women's knowledge of osteoporosis, perceived susceptibility to osteoporosis, and calcium intake. DXAs are low cost, non-invasive measures that influenced calcium intake by women participating in this study. Having bone density assessment, therefore, appears to be an effective intervention in promoting bone health. AN: MN030247
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOsteoporosis Knowledge, Health Beliefs, and Osteoporosis Preventing Behaviors in Women 6 Month Post DXAen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161505-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Osteoporosis Knowledge, Health Beliefs, and Osteoporosis Preventing Behaviors in Women 6 Month Post DXA </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sedlak, Carol</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, Henderson Hall, Kent, OH, 44242, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Margaret Doheny; Patricia Estok; Richard Zeller</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Approximately 28 million people in the United States suffer from osteoporosis or low bone density. The financial and social costs of osteoporosis are high. The purpose of this study was to compare knowledge of osteoporosis, health beliefs, and osteoporosis prevention behaviors (OPB) in women ages 50 to 65 at six months post dual energy absorptiometry (DXA). The Revised Health Belief Model (HBM) provided the theoretical framework. Research questions were: 1) Is there a difference in knowledge of osteoporosis and/or health beliefs in women who had a DXA scan and those who did not? 2) Is there a difference in OPB reported by women who had a DXA scan and those who did not? 3) Is the DXA T-score correlated with knowledge of osteoporosis, health beliefs and/or OPB? In this longitudinal study, 197 women were randomized into two groups. The experimental group (n=97) received a DXA scan at the beginning of the study and the control group (n=100) did not. All completed a questionnaire comprised of the Osteoporosis Knowledge Test (OKT), Osteoporosis Health Belief Scale (OHBS), Osteoporosis Self Efficacy Scale (OSES) (Kim, Horan, &amp; Gendler, 1991), and the Osteoporosis Prevention Behaviors Survey (OPBS) (Doheny &amp; Sedlak, 1995). Outcomes revealed significant differences in the HBM variables of perceived benefits of exercise (t=2.38, p=.018) and perceived barriers to calcium intake (t=-2.49, p=.014). OPB differences were in calcium intake (t=3.679, p&lt;.0001). Knowing DXA results increased women's knowledge of osteoporosis, perceived susceptibility to osteoporosis, and calcium intake. DXAs are low cost, non-invasive measures that influenced calcium intake by women participating in this study. Having bone density assessment, therefore, appears to be an effective intervention in promoting bone health. AN: MN030247 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:22:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:22:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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