Critical Thinking: Another Piece of the Pie in Explaining Participation in Health Behaviors?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161507
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Critical Thinking: Another Piece of the Pie in Explaining Participation in Health Behaviors?
Abstract:
Critical Thinking: Another Piece of the Pie in Explaining Participation in Health Behaviors?
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Settersten, Lori
Contact Address:SON, 36981 Serenity Lane, Oconomowoc, WI, 53066, USA
Co-Authors:Genee Brukwitzki
Many Americans do not participate in health behaviors as recommended, increasing their risk for the occurrence of chronic diseases such as cancer and heart disease. The discovery of a new variable could improve our understanding of why people participate or not in health behaviors. Critical thinking skills may be crucial for processing information and making decisions about as well as actually participating in health behaviors. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between critical thinking and participation in three categories of health behaviors (i.e., health promotion, health protection, and secondary prevention). A cross-sectional, correlational design was used to study a diverse sample of 220 community-dwelling adults aged 18 and over recruited from non-health related groups and organizations in a large, Midwestern, metropolitan community. Participants each completed a self-report questionnaire, including the Test of Everyday Reasoning (Facione & Blohm, 2001) and the Health Practices instrument (Rakowski, Julius, Hickey, & Halter, 1987). In bivariate analyses, critical thinking was associated positively with health promotion and health protection behaviors; critical thinking was not associated with secondary prevention behaviors. Critical thinking may be another piece of the pie of variables that explain participation in many health behaviors. Researchers could explore the relationships between critical thinking and other variables associated with participation in health behaviors, including variables in the different health behavior theories. Researchers could design and test interventions to increase critical thinking as well as promote participation in health behaviors, helping Americans become healthier, develop less chronic diseases, and live longer. AN: MN030113
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCritical Thinking: Another Piece of the Pie in Explaining Participation in Health Behaviors?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161507-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Critical Thinking: Another Piece of the Pie in Explaining Participation in Health Behaviors? </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Settersten, Lori</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 36981 Serenity Lane, Oconomowoc, WI, 53066, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Genee Brukwitzki </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Many Americans do not participate in health behaviors as recommended, increasing their risk for the occurrence of chronic diseases such as cancer and heart disease. The discovery of a new variable could improve our understanding of why people participate or not in health behaviors. Critical thinking skills may be crucial for processing information and making decisions about as well as actually participating in health behaviors. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between critical thinking and participation in three categories of health behaviors (i.e., health promotion, health protection, and secondary prevention). A cross-sectional, correlational design was used to study a diverse sample of 220 community-dwelling adults aged 18 and over recruited from non-health related groups and organizations in a large, Midwestern, metropolitan community. Participants each completed a self-report questionnaire, including the Test of Everyday Reasoning (Facione &amp; Blohm, 2001) and the Health Practices instrument (Rakowski, Julius, Hickey, &amp; Halter, 1987). In bivariate analyses, critical thinking was associated positively with health promotion and health protection behaviors; critical thinking was not associated with secondary prevention behaviors. Critical thinking may be another piece of the pie of variables that explain participation in many health behaviors. Researchers could explore the relationships between critical thinking and other variables associated with participation in health behaviors, including variables in the different health behavior theories. Researchers could design and test interventions to increase critical thinking as well as promote participation in health behaviors, helping Americans become healthier, develop less chronic diseases, and live longer. AN: MN030113 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:22:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:22:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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