2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161508
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Are prenatal cocaine/heroin users different from marijuana-using pregnant women?
Abstract:
Are prenatal cocaine/heroin users different from marijuana-using pregnant women?
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Shieh, Carol
Contact Address:SON, 2300 S. Washington St, PO Box 9003, Kokomo, IN, 46904-9003, USA
Purpose: This study examined whether prenatal cocaine/heroin users are different from their marijuana counterparts in severity of drug use, gestational age when initiating prenatal care, and maternal-fetal attachment. Conceptual framework: Kandel's (1975) theory of drug use sequence, beginning with legal drug use followed by marijuana use and finally the use of cocaine or heroin, is supported by empirical research. This theory allows researchers to speculate that prenatal cocaine/heroin users may have more advanced severity of drug use, late gestational age when initiating prenatal care, and lower maternal-fetal attachment than marijuana-using pregnant women. Study design: A cross sectional design with comparative analyses was used in this study. Subjects: 19 marijuana, 16 cocaine, and 5 heroin users, recruited from a prenatal clinic of an academic medical center in the east coast of the United States, participated in the study. Cocaine and heroin users were combined as a group. Measurements: Eleven questions adopted from the Drug Screening Test (Skinner,1982) and the Simple Screening Instrument for Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse (Allen,1996) were used to assess severity of drug use. Gestational age when initiating prenatal care was calculated in weeks by subtracting the first date of last menstrual period from the date of the first prenatal visit. Cranley's (1981) Maternal-Fetal Attachment Scale with a five-point Likert format was used to measure maternal-fetal attachment. This scale contained 24 items in 5 subscales. Results: Cocaine/heroin users were 6 years older than marijuana-using women. They had significantly higher scores in severity of drug use (t=7.62, p <.0001, df=38) and initiated prenatal care later (t=2.41, p=.02, df=38) than marijuana users. No significant difference in maternal-fetal attachment (t=-0.23, p=.82, df=38) was found between two groups. Conclusions: Some characteristics of prenatal cocaine/heroin users are distinct from those of marijuana-using women. Drug treatment programs should be available for prenatal cocaine/heroin users. AN: MN030087
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAre prenatal cocaine/heroin users different from marijuana-using pregnant women?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161508-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Are prenatal cocaine/heroin users different from marijuana-using pregnant women? </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Shieh, Carol</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 2300 S. Washington St, PO Box 9003, Kokomo, IN, 46904-9003, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: This study examined whether prenatal cocaine/heroin users are different from their marijuana counterparts in severity of drug use, gestational age when initiating prenatal care, and maternal-fetal attachment. Conceptual framework: Kandel's (1975) theory of drug use sequence, beginning with legal drug use followed by marijuana use and finally the use of cocaine or heroin, is supported by empirical research. This theory allows researchers to speculate that prenatal cocaine/heroin users may have more advanced severity of drug use, late gestational age when initiating prenatal care, and lower maternal-fetal attachment than marijuana-using pregnant women. Study design: A cross sectional design with comparative analyses was used in this study. Subjects: 19 marijuana, 16 cocaine, and 5 heroin users, recruited from a prenatal clinic of an academic medical center in the east coast of the United States, participated in the study. Cocaine and heroin users were combined as a group. Measurements: Eleven questions adopted from the Drug Screening Test (Skinner,1982) and the Simple Screening Instrument for Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse (Allen,1996) were used to assess severity of drug use. Gestational age when initiating prenatal care was calculated in weeks by subtracting the first date of last menstrual period from the date of the first prenatal visit. Cranley's (1981) Maternal-Fetal Attachment Scale with a five-point Likert format was used to measure maternal-fetal attachment. This scale contained 24 items in 5 subscales. Results: Cocaine/heroin users were 6 years older than marijuana-using women. They had significantly higher scores in severity of drug use (t=7.62, p &lt;.0001, df=38) and initiated prenatal care later (t=2.41, p=.02, df=38) than marijuana users. No significant difference in maternal-fetal attachment (t=-0.23, p=.82, df=38) was found between two groups. Conclusions: Some characteristics of prenatal cocaine/heroin users are distinct from those of marijuana-using women. Drug treatment programs should be available for prenatal cocaine/heroin users. AN: MN030087 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:22:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:22:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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