Comparison of Wandering Behavior among Elderly with Dementia Residing in Long Term Care Facilities

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161513
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comparison of Wandering Behavior among Elderly with Dementia Residing in Long Term Care Facilities
Abstract:
Comparison of Wandering Behavior among Elderly with Dementia Residing in Long Term Care Facilities
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Song, Jun-Ah
Contact Address:SON, 1946 McIntyre Drive, Ann Arbor, MI, 48105, USA
Co-Authors:Donna Algase
Wandering behavior in elderly with dementia is a problem frequently encountered in acute, extended care, and home settings, posing a great management challenge to caregivers. Knowledge of differences in wandering for different environments has important implications for the study and care of affected people. This study reports preliminary comparison of ratings on a caregiver reporting tool, the Revised Algase Wandering Scale (RAWS), obtained from two types of long term care facilities: nursing home (NH) and assisted living facility (ALF). Thirty-one cognitively impaired, ambulatory, residents (mean age=83.61) were recruited from randomly selected nine NHs and one ALF. Subjects (N=22 for NHs; N=8 for ALF) were evaluated for the level of cognitive impairment using the Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE) and for the level of physical functioning using the six mobility items from the Minimum Data Set including bed mobility, transfer, walking, and locomotion. The RAWS was completed by two nursing caregivers (a charge nurse and a nurse aid) to quantify wandering along seven dimensions (spontaneous walking, ambulation patter/quality, eloping risk, navigational deficit, negative outcomes, pliability, and impulsivity); mean scores were used for analysis. Subjects°¯ age, sex, race, MMSE, and mobility score were compared first using Chi-square test and t-tests. No significant differences found between NH and ALF groups. The RAWS (overall and by subscale) was then examined for difference using t-tests. Although subjects from ALF had higher scores on the RAWS overall and subscales (except for pliability subscale), they did not reach the statistical significance (p < .05). Nearly significant (p=.076) between group difference was found for eloping risk subscale. Results were consistent in a series of ANCOVAs, where the level of cognitive impairment, which is a well-established predictor of level of wandering, was controlled. Further analyses with larger sample may affect the outcome. AN: MN030108
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComparison of Wandering Behavior among Elderly with Dementia Residing in Long Term Care Facilitiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161513-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Comparison of Wandering Behavior among Elderly with Dementia Residing in Long Term Care Facilities </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Song, Jun-Ah</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 1946 McIntyre Drive, Ann Arbor, MI, 48105, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Donna Algase</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Wandering behavior in elderly with dementia is a problem frequently encountered in acute, extended care, and home settings, posing a great management challenge to caregivers. Knowledge of differences in wandering for different environments has important implications for the study and care of affected people. This study reports preliminary comparison of ratings on a caregiver reporting tool, the Revised Algase Wandering Scale (RAWS), obtained from two types of long term care facilities: nursing home (NH) and assisted living facility (ALF). Thirty-one cognitively impaired, ambulatory, residents (mean age=83.61) were recruited from randomly selected nine NHs and one ALF. Subjects (N=22 for NHs; N=8 for ALF) were evaluated for the level of cognitive impairment using the Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE) and for the level of physical functioning using the six mobility items from the Minimum Data Set including bed mobility, transfer, walking, and locomotion. The RAWS was completed by two nursing caregivers (a charge nurse and a nurse aid) to quantify wandering along seven dimensions (spontaneous walking, ambulation patter/quality, eloping risk, navigational deficit, negative outcomes, pliability, and impulsivity); mean scores were used for analysis. Subjects&deg;&macr; age, sex, race, MMSE, and mobility score were compared first using Chi-square test and t-tests. No significant differences found between NH and ALF groups. The RAWS (overall and by subscale) was then examined for difference using t-tests. Although subjects from ALF had higher scores on the RAWS overall and subscales (except for pliability subscale), they did not reach the statistical significance (p &lt; .05). Nearly significant (p=.076) between group difference was found for eloping risk subscale. Results were consistent in a series of ANCOVAs, where the level of cognitive impairment, which is a well-established predictor of level of wandering, was controlled. Further analyses with larger sample may affect the outcome. AN: MN030108 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:22:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:22:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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