The Application of the Transtheoretical Model to Exercise Behavior during Pregnancy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161514
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Application of the Transtheoretical Model to Exercise Behavior during Pregnancy
Abstract:
The Application of the Transtheoretical Model to Exercise Behavior during Pregnancy
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Steele, Nancy
Contact Address:7017 Bonaire Ct, Rockford, MI, 49341, USA
This descriptive cross-sectional study examined the application of Prochaska and DiClemente’s Transtheoretical Model of Behavior Change (TTM) among low risk pregnant women. This study represents the first of its kind to use this model to study prenatal exercise. The TTM constructs utilized were stages of exercise (Precontemplation, Contemplation, Preparation, Action, Maintenance), exercise self-efficacy, and decisional balance (pros and cons) for exercise. The sample included 195 low risk pregnant women (12 to 28 weeks gestation) from an urban area in Michigan. Quantitative data was collected using stages of exercise, exercise self-efficacy, and decisional balance measures modified for pregnancy. Analyses included parametric (one-way ANOVAs, Pearson’s correlations, Post hoc Tukey, and ANCOVAs) and non-parametric (Kruskal Wallis, Mann Whitney U Tests, and Chi-Square) statistics. Women were categorized into one stage of exercise (n=39 per stage). Results revealed a significant relationship between stage of exercise and self-efficacy and decisional balance scores (p<.001). Total scores of the exercise self-efficacy and decisional balance items differentiated women at different stages (p<.001). There was a positive relationship between exercise self-efficacy; pro and decisional balance scores, where mean scores increased with stage progression. There was a negative relationship between con scores and stage progression. There was also a significant relationship between prepregnancy stage of exercise and stage of exercise during pregnancy (p<.001). The largest percentage of women in each prepregnancy stage of exercise remained in their same stage of exercise during pregnancy, Precontemplation (51.9%), Contemplation (51.5%), Preparation (41.7%), Action (34.3%) and Maintenance (46.1%). Between the two prepregnancy stage groups that exercised regularly, 43% of those in Maintenance and 54.3% of those in Action stopped exercising. This study provides preliminary support utilizing the TTM for the identification of exercise determinants that may aid in the design of efficacious interventions to promote exercise during pregnancy. AN: MN030343
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Application of the Transtheoretical Model to Exercise Behavior during Pregnancyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161514-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Application of the Transtheoretical Model to Exercise Behavior during Pregnancy </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Steele, Nancy</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">7017 Bonaire Ct, Rockford, MI, 49341, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This descriptive cross-sectional study examined the application of Prochaska and DiClemente&rsquo;s Transtheoretical Model of Behavior Change (TTM) among low risk pregnant women. This study represents the first of its kind to use this model to study prenatal exercise. The TTM constructs utilized were stages of exercise (Precontemplation, Contemplation, Preparation, Action, Maintenance), exercise self-efficacy, and decisional balance (pros and cons) for exercise. The sample included 195 low risk pregnant women (12 to 28 weeks gestation) from an urban area in Michigan. Quantitative data was collected using stages of exercise, exercise self-efficacy, and decisional balance measures modified for pregnancy. Analyses included parametric (one-way ANOVAs, Pearson&rsquo;s correlations, Post hoc Tukey, and ANCOVAs) and non-parametric (Kruskal Wallis, Mann Whitney U Tests, and Chi-Square) statistics. Women were categorized into one stage of exercise (n=39 per stage). Results revealed a significant relationship between stage of exercise and self-efficacy and decisional balance scores (p&lt;.001). Total scores of the exercise self-efficacy and decisional balance items differentiated women at different stages (p&lt;.001). There was a positive relationship between exercise self-efficacy; pro and decisional balance scores, where mean scores increased with stage progression. There was a negative relationship between con scores and stage progression. There was also a significant relationship between prepregnancy stage of exercise and stage of exercise during pregnancy (p&lt;.001). The largest percentage of women in each prepregnancy stage of exercise remained in their same stage of exercise during pregnancy, Precontemplation (51.9%), Contemplation (51.5%), Preparation (41.7%), Action (34.3%) and Maintenance (46.1%). Between the two prepregnancy stage groups that exercised regularly, 43% of those in Maintenance and 54.3% of those in Action stopped exercising. This study provides preliminary support utilizing the TTM for the identification of exercise determinants that may aid in the design of efficacious interventions to promote exercise during pregnancy. AN: MN030343 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:22:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:22:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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