2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161516
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evaluation of Adverse Effects of Pediatric Emergency Sedation after Discharge
Abstract:
Evaluation of Adverse Effects of Pediatric Emergency Sedation after Discharge
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Steurer, Lisa, MSN, CPNP
P.I. Institution Name:Saint Louis Children's Hospital
Title:Nurse Practitioner
Contact Address:Professional Practice & Systems, One Children's Place, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA
Contact Telephone:(314) 454-4528
Co-Authors:Janet D. Luhmann, MD, Assistant Professor and Mario Schootman, PhD, Biostatistician
Sedation is commonly performed in children in the emergency
department, however, little is known about adverse events that may occur
after discharge. Based on the framework of Leininger, this study was
conducted to evaluate adverse effects occurring after discharge in
children who had undergone sedation in the emergency department. METHODS:
Children receiving pediatric sedation in the emergency department of a
pediatric, academic hospital were enrolled, and demographic data,
procedure, and sedation regimen were collected during the course of the
visit. Parents received a phone call approximately 24 hours after
discharge and completed a telephone questionnaire. Parents were asked to
report on the presence of the following adverse effects: nausea, vomiting,
balance/gait disturbances, lethargy, behavioral changes, headache, sleep
disturbances, hallucinations, nightmares, and ear pain. Other adverse
events experienced were also recorded. Data were analyzed using
descriptive statistics. RESULTS: 547 children were enrolled; 468 (86%)
were successfully contacted and completed the phone questionnaire. Mean
age=7.0 plus or minus 4.7 years, 58% male, and 52% Caucasian. Sedation agents used
included ketamine (62%), nitrous oxide (35%) and others (3%). Sedation was
provided for the following procedures: suturing (32%), fracture reduction
(29%), abscess I and D (14%), foreign body removal (7%), and others (16%).
At least one adverse effect was reported in 42% after discharge from the
emergency department. This included nausea (4%), vomiting (7%), balance
/gait disturbances (5%), lethargy (12%), behavioral changes (7%), headache
(6%), sleep disturbances (4%), hallucinations (2%), nightmares (4%), and
ear pain (0.2%). CONCLUSIONS: Children do experience adverse effects from
sedation after discharge from the emergency department. Anticipatory
guidance about these adverse effects should be given to parents and
caregivers prior to discharge.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvaluation of Adverse Effects of Pediatric Emergency Sedation after Dischargeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161516-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Evaluation of Adverse Effects of Pediatric Emergency Sedation after Discharge</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Steurer, Lisa, MSN, CPNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Saint Louis Children's Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nurse Practitioner</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Professional Practice &amp; Systems, One Children's Place, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(314) 454-4528</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lisami@bjc.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Janet D. Luhmann, MD, Assistant Professor and Mario Schootman, PhD, Biostatistician</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Sedation is commonly performed in children in the emergency <br/> department, however, little is known about adverse events that may occur <br/> after discharge. Based on the framework of Leininger, this study was <br/> conducted to evaluate adverse effects occurring after discharge in <br/> children who had undergone sedation in the emergency department. METHODS: <br/> Children receiving pediatric sedation in the emergency department of a <br/> pediatric, academic hospital were enrolled, and demographic data, <br/> procedure, and sedation regimen were collected during the course of the <br/> visit. Parents received a phone call approximately 24 hours after <br/> discharge and completed a telephone questionnaire. Parents were asked to <br/> report on the presence of the following adverse effects: nausea, vomiting, <br/> balance/gait disturbances, lethargy, behavioral changes, headache, sleep <br/> disturbances, hallucinations, nightmares, and ear pain. Other adverse <br/> events experienced were also recorded. Data were analyzed using <br/> descriptive statistics. RESULTS: 547 children were enrolled; 468 (86%) <br/> were successfully contacted and completed the phone questionnaire. Mean <br/> age=7.0 plus or minus 4.7 years, 58% male, and 52% Caucasian. Sedation agents used <br/> included ketamine (62%), nitrous oxide (35%) and others (3%). Sedation was <br/> provided for the following procedures: suturing (32%), fracture reduction <br/> (29%), abscess I and D (14%), foreign body removal (7%), and others (16%). <br/> At least one adverse effect was reported in 42% after discharge from the <br/> emergency department. This included nausea (4%), vomiting (7%), balance <br/> /gait disturbances (5%), lethargy (12%), behavioral changes (7%), headache <br/> (6%), sleep disturbances (4%), hallucinations (2%), nightmares (4%), and <br/> ear pain (0.2%). CONCLUSIONS: Children do experience adverse effects from <br/> sedation after discharge from the emergency department. Anticipatory <br/> guidance about these adverse effects should be given to parents and <br/> caregivers prior to discharge.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:22:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:22:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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