Modulation of Beta-amyloid Production After Cerebral Ischemia Enhances Functional Recovery

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161517
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Modulation of Beta-amyloid Production After Cerebral Ischemia Enhances Functional Recovery
Abstract:
Modulation of Beta-amyloid Production After Cerebral Ischemia Enhances Functional Recovery
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Briones, Tess, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:Medical-Surgical Nursing, 845 S. Damen Ave., M/C 802, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:(312) 355-3142
Co-Authors:Julie Woods, BS, Research Coordinator; Magdalena Wadowska, BS, Graduate Research Assistant; and Magdalena Rogozinska, BS, Research Assistant
Increase production of beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP) and beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta) are seen following cerebral ischemia. Since evidence exists that the intact adult brain can benefit from environmental stimulation, and that APP processing and Abeta production can be influenced by neuronal activity, we examined whether ischemia-induced Abeta accumulation (amyloidogenesis) could be modulated by environmental æexperience.' Furthermore, we examined whether modulation of amyloidogenesis is accompanied by recovery of function. Thirty-six adult male Wistar rats received either ischemia (n=18) or sham surgery (n=18). Within 3 days after surgery, animals in each group were randomly assigned to either: environmental æexperience' group or socially paired housing (controls). Environmental æexperience' consisted of housing 8-10 rats in a cage filled with a variety of toys intended to stimulate all the senses. These rats were also placed daily in a playpen filled with toys during cage changing. In contrast, rats in the control group were housed in standard laboratory cages. After 14 days of differential housing, rats were tested in the water maze for 9 days: place learning (4 days), probe trial (1 day), and discrimination learning (4 days) tasks. Results showed decreased APP and Abeta expression in the ischemia EC rats compared to the ischemia control animals. In addition, significantly increased levels of neprilysin, an amyloid-degrading enzyme, was seen in the ischemia rats housed in EC compared to the socially housed ischemia rats. Behavioral analyses showed no significant group differences in the place learning tasks and probe trial. However, significantly shorter mean swim latencies were seen in the discrimination learning tasks in rats assigned to EC compared to rats in the socially housed group. These results suggest that housing animals in a multi-sensory environment following cerebral ischemia may prevent the injury-induced accumulation of amyloid deposits and enhance functional recovery. (Funded by NIH NR05260)
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleModulation of Beta-amyloid Production After Cerebral Ischemia Enhances Functional Recoveryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161517-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Modulation of Beta-amyloid Production After Cerebral Ischemia Enhances Functional Recovery</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Briones, Tess, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Medical-Surgical Nursing, 845 S. Damen Ave., M/C 802, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(312) 355-3142</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">tbriones@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Julie Woods, BS, Research Coordinator; Magdalena Wadowska, BS, Graduate Research Assistant; and Magdalena Rogozinska, BS, Research Assistant</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Increase production of beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP) and beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta) are seen following cerebral ischemia. Since evidence exists that the intact adult brain can benefit from environmental stimulation, and that APP processing and Abeta production can be influenced by neuronal activity, we examined whether ischemia-induced Abeta accumulation (amyloidogenesis) could be modulated by environmental &aelig;experience.' Furthermore, we examined whether modulation of amyloidogenesis is accompanied by recovery of function. Thirty-six adult male Wistar rats received either ischemia (n=18) or sham surgery (n=18). Within 3 days after surgery, animals in each group were randomly assigned to either: environmental &aelig;experience' group or socially paired housing (controls). Environmental &aelig;experience' consisted of housing 8-10 rats in a cage filled with a variety of toys intended to stimulate all the senses. These rats were also placed daily in a playpen filled with toys during cage changing. In contrast, rats in the control group were housed in standard laboratory cages. After 14 days of differential housing, rats were tested in the water maze for 9 days: place learning (4 days), probe trial (1 day), and discrimination learning (4 days) tasks. Results showed decreased APP and Abeta expression in the ischemia EC rats compared to the ischemia control animals. In addition, significantly increased levels of neprilysin, an amyloid-degrading enzyme, was seen in the ischemia rats housed in EC compared to the socially housed ischemia rats. Behavioral analyses showed no significant group differences in the place learning tasks and probe trial. However, significantly shorter mean swim latencies were seen in the discrimination learning tasks in rats assigned to EC compared to rats in the socially housed group. These results suggest that housing animals in a multi-sensory environment following cerebral ischemia may prevent the injury-induced accumulation of amyloid deposits and enhance functional recovery. (Funded by NIH NR05260)</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:22:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:22:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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