Investigating Time to Void After Lower Extremity Orthopedic Surgery in a Pediatric Population.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161518
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Investigating Time to Void After Lower Extremity Orthopedic Surgery in a Pediatric Population.
Abstract:
Investigating Time to Void After Lower Extremity Orthopedic Surgery in a Pediatric Population.
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Sherburne, Eileen, MSN, CFNP, APRN, CCNS
P.I. Institution Name:Children's Hospital of Wisconsin
Title:Nurse Practitioner
Contact Address:Department of Nursing - P.O. Box 1997, M.S. 616, 9000 W. Wisconsin Ave., Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA
Contact Telephone:414-266-3063
Co-Authors:Julie Desorcy, BSN
It has been noted that children have required placement of an indwelling urinary catheter due to urinary retention, which can be a complication after lower extremity orthopedic surgery (LEOS). A significant problem that can develop with urinary retention is a stretch injury to the bladder leading to inappropriate increased bladder capacity, atonia and further inability to void. The nursing standard of practice is to wait eight hours after return to the unit for a child to void. An extensive literature review concluded that there was no researched-based data supporting this practice. The study purpose was to investigate the timeframe for children to void after LEOS using standardized formulas and bedside ultrasonography to determine bladder volume. The intent of the study was to identify children at risk for urinary retention. The study population was a convenience sample of 38 children who had undergone LEOS procedures. The study design was descriptive and non-experimental. Study variables included age, sex, length of anesthesia, type of analgesia, mode of analgesia delivery, calculated bladder volume (CBV), IV fluid administration rate (IVR), and time of return to the unit. The ratio of CBV/IVR provided the timeframe to perform ultrasonography for bladder volume and need for further nursing assessment and intervention. Twenty nine per cent of children required straight catheterization. The average length of time to bladder emptying was five hours (4.5 hours for spontaneous void, 6 hours for straight catheterization). SPSS data analysis determined significant correlations (p<.05) between ability to void and length of anesthesia, mode of analgesia administration, and amount of analgesia received. The nursing standard of practice of waiting 8 hours before assessment of voiding was not supported in this study. Nursing practice has been changed to assess for voiding within the first five hours of return to the nursing unit.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInvestigating Time to Void After Lower Extremity Orthopedic Surgery in a Pediatric Population.en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161518-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Investigating Time to Void After Lower Extremity Orthopedic Surgery in a Pediatric Population.</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sherburne, Eileen, MSN, CFNP, APRN, CCNS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Children's Hospital of Wisconsin</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nurse Practitioner</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Nursing - P.O. Box 1997, M.S. 616, 9000 W. Wisconsin Ave., Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">414-266-3063</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">esherburne@chw.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Julie Desorcy, BSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">It has been noted that children have required placement of an indwelling urinary catheter due to urinary retention, which can be a complication after lower extremity orthopedic surgery (LEOS). A significant problem that can develop with urinary retention is a stretch injury to the bladder leading to inappropriate increased bladder capacity, atonia and further inability to void. The nursing standard of practice is to wait eight hours after return to the unit for a child to void. An extensive literature review concluded that there was no researched-based data supporting this practice. The study purpose was to investigate the timeframe for children to void after LEOS using standardized formulas and bedside ultrasonography to determine bladder volume. The intent of the study was to identify children at risk for urinary retention. The study population was a convenience sample of 38 children who had undergone LEOS procedures. The study design was descriptive and non-experimental. Study variables included age, sex, length of anesthesia, type of analgesia, mode of analgesia delivery, calculated bladder volume (CBV), IV fluid administration rate (IVR), and time of return to the unit. The ratio of CBV/IVR provided the timeframe to perform ultrasonography for bladder volume and need for further nursing assessment and intervention. Twenty nine per cent of children required straight catheterization. The average length of time to bladder emptying was five hours (4.5 hours for spontaneous void, 6 hours for straight catheterization). SPSS data analysis determined significant correlations (p&lt;.05) between ability to void and length of anesthesia, mode of analgesia administration, and amount of analgesia received. The nursing standard of practice of waiting 8 hours before assessment of voiding was not supported in this study. Nursing practice has been changed to assess for voiding within the first five hours of return to the nursing unit.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:22:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:22:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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