2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161519
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Older Adults' Perception of Feeling Safe in an Intensive Care Unit
Abstract:
Older Adults' Perception of Feeling Safe in an Intensive Care Unit
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Lasiter, R., PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Central Missouri
Title:Nursing
Contact Address:11417 N Ditzler Ave, Kansas City, MO, 64157, USA
Contact Telephone:(816) 726-1179
Co-Authors:S. Lasiter, Nursing, University of Central Missouri, Warrensburg, MO;
People whose lives have been threatened by critical health events have recounted situations in which feeling safe was essential to recovery. Population statistics predict that in 2030, 72 million people will be age 65 and older. The number of older adults receiving care in ICUs is also likely to increase. There is a growing urgency for the health care system to prepare in anticipation of the increased number of older adults who will require intensive care. Little is known about feeling safe for older adults in ICU. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to increase understanding of feeling safe for older adults who unexpectedly suffered a critical health event and were admitted to an intensive care unit and to develop a substantive grounded theory of feeling safe. Conceptual framework: According to Scherer (2001), feeling is a subjective, emotional reaction that results from events that have significance for an individual. Because of the subjective nature of feelings, the only way to examine feeling is to ask a person to describe their experience. Participants: Ten older adults who (a) were admitted unexpectedly to ICU for a critical health event,(b) were in ICU 1-5 days,(c) had no previous ICU admission, and (d) were able to reflect upon and discuss their experiences in ICU were recruited for this research. Method: Grounded theory (Strauss & Corbin, 1992) method was utilized for this study. Participants were interviewed to explore their experiences of feeling safe in an ICU. Data analysis was carried out as interviews were being conducted. A substantive grounded theory of feeling safe for older adults in ICUs was constructed based on categories that emerged from study data. Findings and Conclusion: Participants' actual and expected interaction with ICU nurses was essential to their perception of feeling safe in ICUs. Four main categories were identified as requisite to interaction with nurses; (a) proximity, (b) oversight, (c) predictability, and (d) initiative. This substantive grounded theory can be utilized by nurses who care for ICU patients and in planning ICU structural design. Further study is needed to explore populations likely to experience an unexpected admission to an ICU.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOlder Adults' Perception of Feeling Safe in an Intensive Care Uniten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161519-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Older Adults' Perception of Feeling Safe in an Intensive Care Unit</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lasiter, R., PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Central Missouri</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">11417 N Ditzler Ave, Kansas City, MO, 64157, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(816) 726-1179</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">slasiter@ucmo.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">S. Lasiter, Nursing, University of Central Missouri, Warrensburg, MO;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">People whose lives have been threatened by critical health events have recounted situations in which feeling safe was essential to recovery. Population statistics predict that in 2030, 72 million people will be age 65 and older. The number of older adults receiving care in ICUs is also likely to increase. There is a growing urgency for the health care system to prepare in anticipation of the increased number of older adults who will require intensive care. Little is known about feeling safe for older adults in ICU. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to increase understanding of feeling safe for older adults who unexpectedly suffered a critical health event and were admitted to an intensive care unit and to develop a substantive grounded theory of feeling safe. Conceptual framework: According to Scherer (2001), feeling is a subjective, emotional reaction that results from events that have significance for an individual. Because of the subjective nature of feelings, the only way to examine feeling is to ask a person to describe their experience. Participants: Ten older adults who (a) were admitted unexpectedly to ICU for a critical health event,(b) were in ICU 1-5 days,(c) had no previous ICU admission, and (d) were able to reflect upon and discuss their experiences in ICU were recruited for this research. Method: Grounded theory (Strauss &amp; Corbin, 1992) method was utilized for this study. Participants were interviewed to explore their experiences of feeling safe in an ICU. Data analysis was carried out as interviews were being conducted. A substantive grounded theory of feeling safe for older adults in ICUs was constructed based on categories that emerged from study data. Findings and Conclusion: Participants' actual and expected interaction with ICU nurses was essential to their perception of feeling safe in ICUs. Four main categories were identified as requisite to interaction with nurses; (a) proximity, (b) oversight, (c) predictability, and (d) initiative. This substantive grounded theory can be utilized by nurses who care for ICU patients and in planning ICU structural design. Further study is needed to explore populations likely to experience an unexpected admission to an ICU.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:22:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:22:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.