Communication approaches and topics of conflict among parents, teens and young adults

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161522
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Communication approaches and topics of conflict among parents, teens and young adults
Abstract:
Communication approaches and topics of conflict among parents, teens and young adults
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Riesch, Susan, DNS/DNSc/DSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin
Title:Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Clinical Sciences Center H6/150, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI, 53792-2455, USA
Contact Telephone:608.263.5169
Parent's and their adult children's present topics of conflict and their communication approaches to solve conflicts during adolescence were described. The concepts of communication, individuation, and connection guided this study. Thirty-three families participated. The families were white and urban-dwelling. The mean age of the young adults and parents was 21.3 and 43.6. Vangelisti's survey instrument and methods of inductive analysis were used. Young adults and parents recalled social activities, family relationships, education, teen safety, and teen acting out as topics of conflict during adolescence. Except for the occasional use of reasoning, during the teen years, the communication approaches were negative such as reactionary, controlling, imposing and withholding. Young adults identified life choices and family relations while parents identified responsibility and family connection as current topics of conflict. Interestingly, young adults and parents identified extremes in present communication approaches from healthy to covert to intimidating. These findings indicate a transition from issues of control and parental responsibility to issues of individuation and connection. The findings may be used as: (a) topics for anticipatory guidance with families and (b) examples of communication approaches that are effective during developmental transitions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCommunication approaches and topics of conflict among parents, teens and young adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161522-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Communication approaches and topics of conflict among parents, teens and young adults</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Riesch, Susan, DNS/DNSc/DSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Clinical Sciences Center H6/150, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI, 53792-2455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">608.263.5169</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">skriesch@facstaff.wisc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Parent's and their adult children's present topics of conflict and their communication approaches to solve conflicts during adolescence were described. The concepts of communication, individuation, and connection guided this study. Thirty-three families participated. The families were white and urban-dwelling. The mean age of the young adults and parents was 21.3 and 43.6. Vangelisti's survey instrument and methods of inductive analysis were used. Young adults and parents recalled social activities, family relationships, education, teen safety, and teen acting out as topics of conflict during adolescence. Except for the occasional use of reasoning, during the teen years, the communication approaches were negative such as reactionary, controlling, imposing and withholding. Young adults identified life choices and family relations while parents identified responsibility and family connection as current topics of conflict. Interestingly, young adults and parents identified extremes in present communication approaches from healthy to covert to intimidating. These findings indicate a transition from issues of control and parental responsibility to issues of individuation and connection. The findings may be used as: (a) topics for anticipatory guidance with families and (b) examples of communication approaches that are effective during developmental transitions.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:22:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:22:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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