Effect of caregiver perception of preparedness on burden in an oncology population

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161529
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effect of caregiver perception of preparedness on burden in an oncology population
Abstract:
Effect of caregiver perception of preparedness on burden in an oncology population
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Scherbring, Mary
Contact Telephone:507.285.7473
Purpose: Identify the level of lay caregiver burden and perception of preparedness that exists for caregivers of oncology population prior to discharge, 7-10 days after discharge, and one month after discharge; determine what change occurs in levels over time; and determine the strength of relationship that exists between the level of burden and perception of preparedness from pre-discharge to one month following discharge. Framework: Caregiver burden is the subjective experience of caregiver that is perceived as stressful and is a consequence of caregiving. Methods: Caregivers completed Robinson’s Caregiver Strain Index and Archbold’s Preparedness Scale at the three identified points in time. Findings: Preparedness levels ranged between somewhat and pretty-well prepared, and were consistent over time. Burden levels were moderate and consistent over time. Increased levels of preparedness were associated with decreased levels of burden, with this relationship consistent over time. Conclusions: Preparedness levels of caregivers can be enhanced. The transition from hospital-to-home doesn’t impact the perception of preparedness experience. Burden experiences of caregivers are real and not affected by the hospital-to-home transition. Implications for Nursing Practice: Interventions to enhance preparedness of lay caregivers are necessary, as the influence on the burden experience can be consequential to caregiver and patient.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffect of caregiver perception of preparedness on burden in an oncology populationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161529-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effect of caregiver perception of preparedness on burden in an oncology population</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Scherbring, Mary</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">507.285.7473</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">scherbring.mary@mayo.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Identify the level of lay caregiver burden and perception of preparedness that exists for caregivers of oncology population prior to discharge, 7-10 days after discharge, and one month after discharge; determine what change occurs in levels over time; and determine the strength of relationship that exists between the level of burden and perception of preparedness from pre-discharge to one month following discharge. Framework: Caregiver burden is the subjective experience of caregiver that is perceived as stressful and is a consequence of caregiving. Methods: Caregivers completed Robinson&rsquo;s Caregiver Strain Index and Archbold&rsquo;s Preparedness Scale at the three identified points in time. Findings: Preparedness levels ranged between somewhat and pretty-well prepared, and were consistent over time. Burden levels were moderate and consistent over time. Increased levels of preparedness were associated with decreased levels of burden, with this relationship consistent over time. Conclusions: Preparedness levels of caregivers can be enhanced. The transition from hospital-to-home doesn&rsquo;t impact the perception of preparedness experience. Burden experiences of caregivers are real and not affected by the hospital-to-home transition. Implications for Nursing Practice: Interventions to enhance preparedness of lay caregivers are necessary, as the influence on the burden experience can be consequential to caregiver and patient.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:22:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:22:51Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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