2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161532
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Using cognitive behavioral therapy to promote exercise behavior in older adults
Abstract:
Using cognitive behavioral therapy to promote exercise behavior in older adults
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Schneider, Joanne, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE
P.I. Institution Name:Saint Louis University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 3525 Caroline Street, St. Louis, MO, 63104, USA
Contact Telephone:314.577.8937
Health benefits of exercise are only obtained when exercise is maintained. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the effects of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) on exercise behavior and functional measures in older adults. Sixteen participants (age 76.3+5.7, range 67-86; 15 White; 10 women) were randomly assigned (stratified by gender) to two groups (8/group). All participants were taught progressive flexibility, strength, endurance, and balance exercises. The experimental group was taught to recognize negative thoughts related to exercise and to counter these thoughts with more positive ones (CBT). CBT had a medium to large effect (ES=.24-.63) on improving participants' 6-minute walking distance, standing full tandem, hamstring flexibility, upper body strength, lower body strength, and functional score. These measures improved 3.8%-22.9%. CBT had a moderate effect (ES=.33-.65) on a number of self-reported exercise behavior components. The CBT group showed 7.5% greater overall exercise behavior than the control group (ES=.12). Results suggest that nurses can train older adults to identify and modify thoughts that interfere with or reduce their exercise behavior and thus improve physical functioning.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUsing cognitive behavioral therapy to promote exercise behavior in older adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161532-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Using cognitive behavioral therapy to promote exercise behavior in older adults</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Schneider, Joanne, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Saint Louis University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 3525 Caroline Street, St. Louis, MO, 63104, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">314.577.8937</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">schneijk@slu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Health benefits of exercise are only obtained when exercise is maintained. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the effects of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) on exercise behavior and functional measures in older adults. Sixteen participants (age 76.3+5.7, range 67-86; 15 White; 10 women) were randomly assigned (stratified by gender) to two groups (8/group). All participants were taught progressive flexibility, strength, endurance, and balance exercises. The experimental group was taught to recognize negative thoughts related to exercise and to counter these thoughts with more positive ones (CBT). CBT had a medium to large effect (ES=.24-.63) on improving participants' 6-minute walking distance, standing full tandem, hamstring flexibility, upper body strength, lower body strength, and functional score. These measures improved 3.8%-22.9%. CBT had a moderate effect (ES=.33-.65) on a number of self-reported exercise behavior components. The CBT group showed 7.5% greater overall exercise behavior than the control group (ES=.12). Results suggest that nurses can train older adults to identify and modify thoughts that interfere with or reduce their exercise behavior and thus improve physical functioning.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:22:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:22:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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