2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161533
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Clinical reasoning in experienced nurses
Abstract:
Clinical reasoning in experienced nurses
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Simmons, Barbara
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:Clinical Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 845 South Damen Avenue, M/C 802, 740 NURS, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:312.413.0581
As an essential component of nursing practice, clinical reasoning is used to assimilate information, analyze data, and make decisions regarding patient care. Changes in health care settings and patient acuity challenge nurses to make complex decisions under conditions of uncertainty and risk. This qualitative descriptive study was designed to explore the cognitive strategies used by experienced nurses as they reasoned about assessment findings of their assigned patients. Few studies of nurses' clinical reasoning have been conducted in a practice setting during actual patient care. Information processing theory and heuristics provided the theoretical framework for the study. Fifteen experienced nurses were asked to "think aloud" about their beginning shift assessments. Experienced was defined as a registered nurse with no advanced degree or certification who had worked on a medical-surgical unit more than 2 years but less than 10 years full time. Think aloud data was audiotaped and transcribed. The steps of protocol analysis advanced in levels of abstraction by separating data into concepts, identifying links among concepts, and providing an overview of the reasoning process. Results of this research will assist less experienced nurses make decisions, provide direction for undergraduate and graduate curricula, enhance staff orientation programs, and improve decision support software.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleClinical reasoning in experienced nursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161533-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Clinical reasoning in experienced nurses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Simmons, Barbara</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 845 South Damen Avenue, M/C 802, 740 NURS, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312.413.0581</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">simmonsb@uic.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">As an essential component of nursing practice, clinical reasoning is used to assimilate information, analyze data, and make decisions regarding patient care. Changes in health care settings and patient acuity challenge nurses to make complex decisions under conditions of uncertainty and risk. This qualitative descriptive study was designed to explore the cognitive strategies used by experienced nurses as they reasoned about assessment findings of their assigned patients. Few studies of nurses' clinical reasoning have been conducted in a practice setting during actual patient care. Information processing theory and heuristics provided the theoretical framework for the study. Fifteen experienced nurses were asked to &quot;think aloud&quot; about their beginning shift assessments. Experienced was defined as a registered nurse with no advanced degree or certification who had worked on a medical-surgical unit more than 2 years but less than 10 years full time. Think aloud data was audiotaped and transcribed. The steps of protocol analysis advanced in levels of abstraction by separating data into concepts, identifying links among concepts, and providing an overview of the reasoning process. Results of this research will assist less experienced nurses make decisions, provide direction for undergraduate and graduate curricula, enhance staff orientation programs, and improve decision support software.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:22:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:22:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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