2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161538
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Self-treatmetn of pain in a rural community
Abstract:
Self-treatmetn of pain in a rural community
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Vallerand, April
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 364 Cohn, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202., USA
Contact Telephone:313.577.0359
In the United States, 42% of adults say they experience pain daily, the majority often relying on self-treatment. As multiple medication use increases, so does the likelihood of serious drug interactions. Also, an increasing number of people are seeking alternative therapies, often without informing their traditional health care providers. This exploratory/descriptive study examined the occurrence of pain and the modalities of self-treatment used by community members from a rural area of Michigan. Participants completed demographic, pain, and self-treatment questionnaires. The purpose of this study was to determine potential interactions between self-treatment choices and other medications/supplements taken. The participants, 74 female and 33 male, were mostly of Eastern European descent with a mean age of 58 and a mean educational level of 14.5 years. Data revealed 66% taking prescription medication, 75% taking OTC medications, 20% using herbal supplements and 30% using non-pharmacological treatments. At least 30% were taking medications for other health problems. Multiple medication use increases the risk for potential drug interactions, a risk complicated by the fact that 22.2% did not inform their primary care practitioner of their self-treatment choices. Data will contribute to knowledge of current treatment choices regarding pain management and potentially harmful interactions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSelf-treatmetn of pain in a rural communityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161538-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Self-treatmetn of pain in a rural community</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Vallerand, April</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 364 Cohn, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202., USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">313.577.0359</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">april.vallerand@wayne.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">In the United States, 42% of adults say they experience pain daily, the majority often relying on self-treatment. As multiple medication use increases, so does the likelihood of serious drug interactions. Also, an increasing number of people are seeking alternative therapies, often without informing their traditional health care providers. This exploratory/descriptive study examined the occurrence of pain and the modalities of self-treatment used by community members from a rural area of Michigan. Participants completed demographic, pain, and self-treatment questionnaires. The purpose of this study was to determine potential interactions between self-treatment choices and other medications/supplements taken. The participants, 74 female and 33 male, were mostly of Eastern European descent with a mean age of 58 and a mean educational level of 14.5 years. Data revealed 66% taking prescription medication, 75% taking OTC medications, 20% using herbal supplements and 30% using non-pharmacological treatments. At least 30% were taking medications for other health problems. Multiple medication use increases the risk for potential drug interactions, a risk complicated by the fact that 22.2% did not inform their primary care practitioner of their self-treatment choices. Data will contribute to knowledge of current treatment choices regarding pain management and potentially harmful interactions.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:23:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:23:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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