Predictive relationship between prenatal maternal health behaviors and preschooler health status

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161543
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Predictive relationship between prenatal maternal health behaviors and preschooler health status
Abstract:
Predictive relationship between prenatal maternal health behaviors and preschooler health status
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Wieseke, Ann
P.I. Institution Name:Ball State University
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Muncie, IN, 47306, USA
Contact Telephone:765.285.5588
Research suggests that prenatal maternal health behaviors contribute to the birth of healthier infants. However, effects of prenatal behaviors on child's health at later times are not known. The purpose of this study was to extend tenets of family systems theory (Goldberg & Goldberg, 1993) and examine the predictive relationship between prenatal exercise participation and vitamin intake on the health of three-year-olds. Mothers (n=9300) were sampled in 1988 and again in 1991 as part of the National Maternal and Infant Health Surveys. Bivariate analysis revealed that mothers who did not take vitamins or exercise during pregnancy were more likely to report preschooler's health as average or below average. By logistical regression, mothers who did not exercise before pregnancy were also more likely to report preschooler's health as average or below average (odds ratio=0.80). However, study variables other than mother's prenatal behaviors were stronger predictors of preschooler's health, including maternal education, maternal depressive symptoms, maternal race, receipt of government aid, male gender, and very low birthweight. Nurses can emphasize the benefits of prenatal exercise and vitamin intake for children over time. In addition, nurses can assess for family constellations at risk for diminished child health and plan for early interventions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePredictive relationship between prenatal maternal health behaviors and preschooler health statusen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161543-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Predictive relationship between prenatal maternal health behaviors and preschooler health status</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wieseke, Ann</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Ball State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Muncie, IN, 47306, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">765.285.5588</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">awieseke@bsu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Research suggests that prenatal maternal health behaviors contribute to the birth of healthier infants. However, effects of prenatal behaviors on child's health at later times are not known. The purpose of this study was to extend tenets of family systems theory (Goldberg &amp; Goldberg, 1993) and examine the predictive relationship between prenatal exercise participation and vitamin intake on the health of three-year-olds. Mothers (n=9300) were sampled in 1988 and again in 1991 as part of the National Maternal and Infant Health Surveys. Bivariate analysis revealed that mothers who did not take vitamins or exercise during pregnancy were more likely to report preschooler's health as average or below average. By logistical regression, mothers who did not exercise before pregnancy were also more likely to report preschooler's health as average or below average (odds ratio=0.80). However, study variables other than mother's prenatal behaviors were stronger predictors of preschooler's health, including maternal education, maternal depressive symptoms, maternal race, receipt of government aid, male gender, and very low birthweight. Nurses can emphasize the benefits of prenatal exercise and vitamin intake for children over time. In addition, nurses can assess for family constellations at risk for diminished child health and plan for early interventions.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:23:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:23:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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